The Dylan Thread

For new sounds, old sounds and favourite sound discussion...

Moderators: sunny, spzretent, BzaInSpace, runcible

Re: The Dylan Thread

Postby The Dr » Sat Nov 01, 2014 7:21 pm

Bob Dylan's new album 'Shadows In The Night' to be released in 2015

Presumed covers album will be the singer's first release in three years

Bob Dylan's new album 'Shadows In The Night' to be released in 2015



The news was revealed in a flyer that was inserted into advance copies of Dylan's new 'Basement Tapes Complete' boxset, which is out next week. A note in the box set simply read: "Bob Dylan, 'Shadows in the Night', New album coming in 2015."

Rumours about the LP began to arise in May after Dylan posted a cover of Frank Sinatra's 1945 hit 'Full Moon And Empty Arms' onto his website.



The 73-year-old's forthcoming album was later confirmed by a spokesperson for the singer, who said: "The track is definitely from a forthcoming album due later on this year." It has since been speculated that 'Shadows In The Night' will be an album of cover songs by Dylan.

'Shadows in the Night' will be Dylan's 36th Studio recording and his first release 2012's 'Tempest'. Though other songs on the album are still unclear, Dylan began ending his live set this week with another Sinatra hit, 'Stay With Me'.

The folk-singer, who is currently performing multiple nights at venues across north America, is to be honoured in a Gala next year after being chosen as the 2015 MusiCares Person of the Year.
“You're not Dostoevsky,' said the citizeness

'Well, who knows, who knows,' he replied.

'Dostoevsky's dead,' said the citizeness, but somehow not very confidently.

'I protest!' Behemoth exclaimed hotly. 'Dostoevsky is immortal!”
The Dr
Known user
 
Posts: 1355
Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2012 6:32 pm
Location: some forgotten memory/ midday of eternity

Re: The Dylan Thread

Postby The Dr » Tue Dec 09, 2014 11:02 pm

feb 2/3rd


1. I'm A Fool To Want You
2. The Night We Called It A Day
3. Stay With Me
4. Autumn Leaves
5. Why Try to Change Me Now
6. Some Enchanted Evening
7. Full Moon And Empty Arms
8. Where Are You?
9. What'll I Do
10. That Lucky Old Sun


Shadows In The Night is Bob Dylan's newest studio album, and marks the first new music from the artist since 2012's worldwide hit Tempest. Featuring ten tracks, the Jack Frost-produced album is the 36th studio set from Bob Dylan and marks the first new music from the artist since 2012's worldwide hit Tempest.

Regarding the repertoire on this album, Bob Dylan commented, "It was a real privilege to make this album. I've wanted to do something like this for a long time but was never brave enough to approach 30-piece complicated arrangements and refine them down for a 5-piece band. That's the key to all these performances. We knew these songs extremely well. It was all done live. Maybe one or two takes. No overdubbing. No vocal booths. No headphones. No separate tracking, and, for the most part, mixed as it was recorded. I don't see myself as covering these songs in any way. They've been covered enough. Buried, as a matter a fact. What me and my band are basically doing is uncovering them. Lifting them out of the grave and bringing them into the light of day."

Bob Dylan's five previous studio albums have been universally hailed as among the best of his storied career, achieving new levels of commercial success and critical acclaim for the artist. The Platinum-selling Time Out Of Mind from 1997 earned multiple Grammy Awards, including Album Of The Year, while "Love and Theft" continued Dylan's Platinum streak and earned several Grammy nominations and a statue for Best Contemporary Folk album. Modern Times, released in 2006, became one of the artist's most popular albums, selling more than 2.5 million copies worldwide and earning Dylan two more Grammys. Together Through Life became the artist's first album to debut at #1 in both the U.S. and the UK, as well as in five other countries, on its way to surpassing sales of one million copies. Tempest received unanimous worldwide critical acclaim upon release and reached the Top 5 in 14 countries, while the artist s globe-spanning concert tours of the past few years have heavily emphasized that album s singular repertoire. Bob Dylan has sold more than 125 million records around the world.
“You're not Dostoevsky,' said the citizeness

'Well, who knows, who knows,' he replied.

'Dostoevsky's dead,' said the citizeness, but somehow not very confidently.

'I protest!' Behemoth exclaimed hotly. 'Dostoevsky is immortal!”
The Dr
Known user
 
Posts: 1355
Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2012 6:32 pm
Location: some forgotten memory/ midday of eternity

Re: The Dylan Thread

Postby angelsighs » Tue Dec 16, 2014 9:34 pm

I'm actually quite intruiged to hear this. I like the fact he is using his touring band rather than slapping on loads of strings etc. at the very least it will be a curio.


in other Bob news:

Bob plays a gig for a single fan! part of this film series where people experience an activity alone, that is traditionally social.

http://en.experimentensam.com/bob-dylan
angelsighs
Known user
 
Posts: 3921
Joined: Thu Jan 01, 1970 1:00 am

Re: The Dylan Thread

Postby The Dr » Tue Jan 20, 2015 2:32 pm

return to the basement

Garth Hudson Returns to Big Pink



and another from the new album



“You're not Dostoevsky,' said the citizeness

'Well, who knows, who knows,' he replied.

'Dostoevsky's dead,' said the citizeness, but somehow not very confidently.

'I protest!' Behemoth exclaimed hotly. 'Dostoevsky is immortal!”
The Dr
Known user
 
Posts: 1355
Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2012 6:32 pm
Location: some forgotten memory/ midday of eternity

Re: The Dylan Thread

Postby TheWarmth » Tue Jan 20, 2015 8:44 pm

I received the 3xLP / 2xCD version of the new Basement Tapes release for Christmas and have been really digging into it.. "Tiny Montgomery" and "Yea! Heavy and a Bottle of Bread" are my favorite tracks at the moment. The lyrics are insane: "Slap that drummer with a pie that smells!!!" I know that both of the aforementioned tracks appear on the original '75 album, but I never got too deep into that, so I'm going to have to revisit it. Either way, I'm very happy with this new release. Not sure if I'd be able to handle the 6xcd version, though.
TheWarmth
Known user
 
Posts: 3666
Joined: Thu Jan 01, 1970 1:00 am
Location: Chicago, IL

Re: The Dylan Thread

Postby The Dr » Thu Jan 22, 2015 1:40 pm

not another one...

Joni Mitchell on Bob Dylan: "I am much more original musically"

Singer also claims music is "pretty much" over for her...

Joni Mitchell has stated that she believes she is far more creative than her fellow musician, Bob Dylan.

In an interview in The Sunday Times, she claims “I am much more original musically, and a much more original thinker” than Dylan.

Mitchell, who releases a new 4 disc box set compilation Love Has Many Faces today [November 24], also admitted “Music is over for me, pretty much. I can’t sing: I don’t want to. I want to paint, and I want to write. I can’t tour, I can’t travel, I’m sick; I can fly two flights a year. I’m old. You have to know when to give up.”

She also spoke openly about her impressions of being a woman operating in a male dominated industry.

“I’m a woman in a man’s world. There are hardly any women in my business. There are oppressive men and exploitative men. Georgia O’Keeffe used to talk about them — men this and men that — too. The men said, ‘You can’t paint New York City’ — she did some fantastic paintings of New York City. It’s all male-dominant, and you’re always with them. I’m on the road with 21 guys, and I love men’s company, don’t get me wrong. Even when they’re stupid little boys, I still like them. I mean, love the sinner, hate the sin.”

She also expressed her views on being considered part of the hippie generation: “The hippie values were not mine, they were naive, they had no place, they were childish; the politics were stupid. When they became a large minority, the straights noticed, grew their hair long and took over.”

Mitchell last released a studio album, Shine, in 2007.

Read more at http://www.uncut.co.uk/node/21090#Cs2iiFXgMKQFPd2D.99
“You're not Dostoevsky,' said the citizeness

'Well, who knows, who knows,' he replied.

'Dostoevsky's dead,' said the citizeness, but somehow not very confidently.

'I protest!' Behemoth exclaimed hotly. 'Dostoevsky is immortal!”
The Dr
Known user
 
Posts: 1355
Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2012 6:32 pm
Location: some forgotten memory/ midday of eternity

Re: The Dylan Thread

Postby The Dr » Fri Jan 23, 2015 4:27 pm

“You're not Dostoevsky,' said the citizeness

'Well, who knows, who knows,' he replied.

'Dostoevsky's dead,' said the citizeness, but somehow not very confidently.

'I protest!' Behemoth exclaimed hotly. 'Dostoevsky is immortal!”
The Dr
Known user
 
Posts: 1355
Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2012 6:32 pm
Location: some forgotten memory/ midday of eternity

Re: The Dylan Thread

Postby jack white » Sat Jan 24, 2015 4:29 pm

Now I’ve always been the kind of person that doesn’t like to trespass
but sometimes you just find yourself over the line
Lou: ... We're just out of balance
Betsy: you & me?
Lou: [the] whole world
jack white
Known user
 
Posts: 1673
Joined: Sat Jan 31, 2004 12:29 am
Location: Floor of the ocean

Re: The Dylan Thread

Postby The Dr » Sat Jan 24, 2015 7:51 pm

“You're not Dostoevsky,' said the citizeness

'Well, who knows, who knows,' he replied.

'Dostoevsky's dead,' said the citizeness, but somehow not very confidently.

'I protest!' Behemoth exclaimed hotly. 'Dostoevsky is immortal!”
The Dr
Known user
 
Posts: 1355
Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2012 6:32 pm
Location: some forgotten memory/ midday of eternity

Re: The Dylan Thread

Postby The Dr » Wed Feb 04, 2015 9:44 am

shadows in the night


listening to the album feels like falling in love. each song greater than the last, and considering it starts with 'i'm a fool to want you' that is high praise indeed. dylan tackles sinatra songs- songs that you and i may not have known were sinatra (no strangers in the night, my way etc)- in a way that does not tackle them but rather, lovingly, put them on like an old favourite suit. the songs were sinatra's but now they are dylan's. the singing, like the music, understated and achingly beautiful. walk along the seafront looking at the moon with a smile on your face and a tear in your eye. to paraphrase dylan 'In this age of fiberglass I have found a gem'
“You're not Dostoevsky,' said the citizeness

'Well, who knows, who knows,' he replied.

'Dostoevsky's dead,' said the citizeness, but somehow not very confidently.

'I protest!' Behemoth exclaimed hotly. 'Dostoevsky is immortal!”
The Dr
Known user
 
Posts: 1355
Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2012 6:32 pm
Location: some forgotten memory/ midday of eternity

Re: The Dylan Thread

Postby semisynthetic » Fri Mar 13, 2015 8:56 pm

The Dr wrote:http://www.aarp.org/entertainment/style-trends/info-2015/bob-dylan-aarp-magazine.html


I read this very quickly when I went to get a Dental Checkup; and I picked up the magazine because Dylan was on the cover; but it took me a moment to find the Song List so I'd better understand the AARP connection; (not even believing to bring Dylan's age into the equation mattered). I look forward to obtaining the recordings. I have several of these songs on 78 rpm. It is good to see them listed; on the gramophone, that "Time Machine Effect" is very real; I am interested in what Dylan does with them.
"Everything is a Poison; it is the amount or degree that separates one Poison from another"
Paracelsus
semisynthetic
Known user
 
Posts: 1447
Joined: Mon Nov 01, 2010 6:39 pm
Location: Undefined; drifting ever further and further away

Re: The Dylan Thread

Postby The Dr » Sat Mar 14, 2015 6:42 pm

http://us.macmillan.com/anothersideofbo ... ormaymudes

a very good biography of dylan written by the son of a former freind/road manager on and off from the early 60s to 1999. it contains interesting information but not in the gossipy way, information added as part of the context but not elaborated upon, for example sara playing the author's wife songs from blood on the tracks and explaining what is happening behind them whilst dylan storms in and says 'how can anyone listen to that?!' and the reason why he married sara and not joan baez.

interesting book, worth a read- probably better than the other ton of books about him that are out there and coming out constantly! and not a single trace of Greil Marcus! thankfully
“You're not Dostoevsky,' said the citizeness

'Well, who knows, who knows,' he replied.

'Dostoevsky's dead,' said the citizeness, but somehow not very confidently.

'I protest!' Behemoth exclaimed hotly. 'Dostoevsky is immortal!”
The Dr
Known user
 
Posts: 1355
Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2012 6:32 pm
Location: some forgotten memory/ midday of eternity

Re: The Dylan Thread

Postby angelsighs » Mon Mar 23, 2015 8:08 pm

Dylan books are an industry unto themselves. He has got to be the rock star whose had most books written about him (even more than The Beatles?), I guess because he has had such a long career with so many different phases and there is a lot to get your teeth into in terms of analysing lyrics (I mean, the Stones have had just as long a career but probably not as much to analyse with them?)

I recently read Time Out of Mind: The Lives of Bob Dylan by Ian Bell. it was a really good read as he's not afraid to criticise him, in fact I disgreed with much of it including his relatively harsh assessments of Desire and TOOM. But a great read overall and the fact it starts with Blood on The Tracks (there was a Vol 1 already released) means that it doesn't cover albums that have already been analysed to death.
angelsighs
Known user
 
Posts: 3921
Joined: Thu Jan 01, 1970 1:00 am

Re: The Dylan Thread

Postby davedecay » Tue Mar 24, 2015 3:23 pm

Got this from a friend on Sunday:

Image
davedecay
Known user
 
Posts: 1154
Joined: Tue Feb 17, 2004 6:04 am
Location: PA, USA

Re: The Dylan Thread

Postby The Dr » Wed May 27, 2015 7:30 pm

Newport folk festival to mark 50 years since Dylan went electric



It was the 1965 festival at which Bob Dylan famously strapped on a Fender Stratocaster and shocked his fanbase with a three-song electric set. Now, 50 years on from this iconic moment in rock history, the Newport folk festival plans to pay tribute with a secret lineup of musicians billed as ’65 Revisited.

According to festival producer Jay Sweet, an “all-star lineup” of nearly a dozen contemporary artists will come together to celebrate the moment when Dylan went electric. Dylan has an open invitation to play each year at Newport – an offer he took up in 2002 – but is not expected to appear this year.

“Having him back would be the least Newport way to celebrate it,” said Sweet. “Trying to recreate that moment is a fool’s errand. We’re about the future, not about reliving the past.”

Dylan’s decision to abandon – or at least build on - his folk roots by enlisting the help of a rock’n’roll backing band was hugely controversial at the time. Many fans thought Dylan was selling out the values of an important movement in search of the current trend. The famous audience cry of “Judas” came less than a year later, when he played at Manchester Free Trade Hall.

The guitar Dylan played at the Newport gig sold for $965,000 (£590,432) at auction in 2013. The Newport folk festival runs from 24-26 July. The festival’s other headliners include Roger Waters and the Decemberists.


----


booo! what was that, sorry i meant CHINGGGGGGGGG
“You're not Dostoevsky,' said the citizeness

'Well, who knows, who knows,' he replied.

'Dostoevsky's dead,' said the citizeness, but somehow not very confidently.

'I protest!' Behemoth exclaimed hotly. 'Dostoevsky is immortal!”
The Dr
Known user
 
Posts: 1355
Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2012 6:32 pm
Location: some forgotten memory/ midday of eternity

Re: The Dylan Thread

Postby BzaInSpace » Thu May 28, 2015 8:30 am

The Dr wrote:"...We’re about the future, not about reliving the past..."


Sure...

Shame Pete Seeger isn't around to try and cut the power off mid-set with an axe...
again.
O P 8
BzaInSpace
Site Admin
 
Posts: 3417
Joined: Thu Jan 01, 1970 1:00 am
Location: HELL

Re: The Dylan Thread

Postby The Dr » Fri May 29, 2015 7:10 pm

BzaInSpace wrote:
The Dr wrote:"...We’re about the future, not about reliving the past..."


Sure...

Shame Pete Seeger isn't around to try and cut the power off mid-set with an axe...
again.


are you trying to say that the festival that booed dylan and has lived off it since (would it still be here now if it had not happened?) may not be being sincere when they say they 'don't look back'? :wink:
“You're not Dostoevsky,' said the citizeness

'Well, who knows, who knows,' he replied.

'Dostoevsky's dead,' said the citizeness, but somehow not very confidently.

'I protest!' Behemoth exclaimed hotly. 'Dostoevsky is immortal!”
The Dr
Known user
 
Posts: 1355
Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2012 6:32 pm
Location: some forgotten memory/ midday of eternity

The Dylan Thread

Postby BzaInSpace » Wed Jul 22, 2015 1:43 pm

The last few weeks I've been mainlining a certain few records which I'll post about elsewhere, but one of them I've obsessed over is the mighty Time Out Of Mind.

I think I've mentioned before that I was not familiar with this album at all apart from the epic 'Highlands', so I had to really dig deeper...

Amazing album. Lanois really got the swamp in his production didn't he?

The standard Dylan thing for me applies to this album to however - the tracks that are best known and included on official compilations are probably my least favourite. 'Make You Feel My Love' I find pretty weak.

'Not Dark Yet' isn't so bad however, but a few others I find dull and likely to skip.

On the other hand 'Love Sick', 'Cold Irons Bound' and 'Til' I Fell In Love With You' are just incredible.

However for me the real highlight of this record (and the track I replay endlessly) is 'Dirt Road Blues' - just awesome.

Also adds to my opinion that Dylan's latter work is best when he's simply doing reboots of ancient blues tracks...
O P 8
BzaInSpace
Site Admin
 
Posts: 3417
Joined: Thu Jan 01, 1970 1:00 am
Location: HELL

Re: The Dylan Thread

Postby angelsighs » Wed Jul 22, 2015 6:45 pm

yes yes and a thousand times yes Bza!
Time Out of Mind is a particular favourite of mine. there are shades of it elsewhere in the Dylan catalogue (Sugar Baby, Mississippi) but there's nothing else with that particular atmosphere and ghostly, world weary mix of death dread and heartache all the way through. some songs are better than others but there's no songs I skip on it- that swampy production and sense of depth in the production really does it for me and binds it all together. Lanois did a wonderful job. even the more formulaic bluesy numbers shine.

Dirt Road Blues is definitely a gem of a deep cut! i love the groove it's got.
angelsighs
Known user
 
Posts: 3921
Joined: Thu Jan 01, 1970 1:00 am

Re: The Dylan Thread

Postby angelsighs » Mon Aug 17, 2015 7:37 pm

rumours are circulating on what the next installment of the Bootleg Series might consist of.

the goss is that it was to be a Blood on The Tracks set, but that's been bumped until next time.
this is because instead they are releasing a set covering the 'Electric Trilogy' of 65-66. there might be a smaller release as well as a huge boxset covering the entire sessions. this is for copyright protection reasons- they have to release it all in 2015 or their copyright will expire (wasn't there a similar thing with some Beatles releases recently?)

just rumours at the mo..
angelsighs
Known user
 
Posts: 3921
Joined: Thu Jan 01, 1970 1:00 am

Re: The Dylan Thread

Postby The Dr » Mon Aug 17, 2015 8:25 pm

4: I’ve heard from several sources that the next “Bootleg Series” release will be a little different from the norm and that you may need to start saving for it now. Although there is no official confirmation of the rumour, we are hearing that there might be a 2-CD release, a 6-CD Box set, and a huge boxed release covering all of the studio sessions from 1965 and 1966. There is talk that this release might run to 18 discs!!! If only studio material is to be included, then 18 discs seems a lot. ISIS tends not to speculate too much on these releases but we have heard this from three sources, all of which are usually reliable. The release date is anticipated as being October 2015. This release may mean that there will not be a “Copyright Protection” release this year. Only time will tell…



hmmm sounds expensive...
“You're not Dostoevsky,' said the citizeness

'Well, who knows, who knows,' he replied.

'Dostoevsky's dead,' said the citizeness, but somehow not very confidently.

'I protest!' Behemoth exclaimed hotly. 'Dostoevsky is immortal!”
The Dr
Known user
 
Posts: 1355
Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2012 6:32 pm
Location: some forgotten memory/ midday of eternity

Re: The Dylan Thread

Postby jack white » Wed Aug 19, 2015 9:52 am

some of these bootleggers, they make pretty good stuff..
Lou: ... We're just out of balance
Betsy: you & me?
Lou: [the] whole world
jack white
Known user
 
Posts: 1673
Joined: Sat Jan 31, 2004 12:29 am
Location: Floor of the ocean

Re: The Dylan Thread

Postby The Dr » Wed Aug 19, 2015 9:11 pm

Clickhole, a satire website poking fun at the likes of Buzzfeed, has successfully raised over £1,000 ($1,500) to send Bob Dylan "a nice bed".

The website, an offshoot of The Onion, launched a GoFundMe page two weeks ago, outlining their strange aim.

A message on the crowdfunding website read: "For over 50 years, Bob Dylan has been one of the most celebrated figures in American music... He has given us everything while asking nothing in return, and for that, we think it’s about time that America said 'thank you' for all his contributions to our ears and our hearts."

"Hence, we have started this GoFundMe page with the goal of purchasing Bob a brand-new Sleep Number® adjustable bed. This includes a classic c2 Sleep Number® mattress, a sturdy modular base, and an intuitive wireless remote for adjusting the bed’s firmness."

Having raised a total of $1,555, the website recently claimed that they've shipped the bed to Dylan. "Bob’s bed officially shipped over the weekend," a message posted to Facebook read.

"Also, the beautiful Bob Dylan duvet cover that we purchased with the extra funds was delivered this morning and signed for by someone named “F Lamb”—perhaps the pseudonym Bob uses when he travels? Who’s to say?!?

Thanks again for all your support! We couldn’t be more excited. ?#?BedForBob?"

Read more at http://www.nme.com/news/bob-dylan/87658 ... RtEBmGg.99

http://www.gofundme.com/2jc4yga2s
“You're not Dostoevsky,' said the citizeness

'Well, who knows, who knows,' he replied.

'Dostoevsky's dead,' said the citizeness, but somehow not very confidently.

'I protest!' Behemoth exclaimed hotly. 'Dostoevsky is immortal!”
The Dr
Known user
 
Posts: 1355
Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2012 6:32 pm
Location: some forgotten memory/ midday of eternity

Re: The Dylan Thread

Postby angelsighs » Mon Aug 24, 2015 10:30 pm

a nice bed? I don't get it?


yeah, that mooted boxset is gonna be pretty damn expensive. too rich for my blood I am sure. 2CD version for me thanks.
angelsighs
Known user
 
Posts: 3921
Joined: Thu Jan 01, 1970 1:00 am

Re: The Dylan Thread

Postby davedecay » Wed Aug 26, 2015 7:27 pm

my friend posted this today, and I had to laugh. He's an insurance adjuster.

A customer on the phone today was mad because we cannot realistically get any money from the jobless, uninsured vet that totaled his building. He said "To Quote Bob Dylan, when you ain't got nothing, you got nothing to lose, ya know what I mean". I replied back, I got ya, "you don't need a weatherman to know which way the wind blows" Maybe a new trend, desk Dylaning ???

:mrgreen:
davedecay
Known user
 
Posts: 1154
Joined: Tue Feb 17, 2004 6:04 am
Location: PA, USA

Re: The Dylan Thread

Postby angelsighs » Wed Aug 26, 2015 9:09 pm

he should have actually quoted 'Trying To Get To Heaven" back at him:

"when you think that you've lost everything/ ya find out you can lose a little more"

:)
angelsighs
Known user
 
Posts: 3921
Joined: Thu Jan 01, 1970 1:00 am

Re: The Dylan Thread

Postby The Dr » Fri Aug 28, 2015 2:50 pm

money doesn't talk it swears
“You're not Dostoevsky,' said the citizeness

'Well, who knows, who knows,' he replied.

'Dostoevsky's dead,' said the citizeness, but somehow not very confidently.

'I protest!' Behemoth exclaimed hotly. 'Dostoevsky is immortal!”
The Dr
Known user
 
Posts: 1355
Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2012 6:32 pm
Location: some forgotten memory/ midday of eternity

Re: The Dylan Thread

Postby angelsighs » Wed Sep 23, 2015 8:12 pm

get your credit cards ready people...

https://www.sainsburysentertainment.co. ... t=V6505246
angelsighs
Known user
 
Posts: 3921
Joined: Thu Jan 01, 1970 1:00 am

Re: The Dylan Thread

Postby bambam » Thu Sep 24, 2015 3:44 am

Also read somewhere there is an 18 disc version as well.....
bambam
Known user
 
Posts: 76
Joined: Sun Sep 19, 2004 4:44 am

Re: The Dylan Thread

Postby runaway » Thu Sep 24, 2015 5:18 am

I can barely get through an entire Dylan album, never mind 7+ hours of the stuff!
runaway
Known user
 
Posts: 465
Joined: Thu Jan 01, 1970 1:00 am
Location: the shadows

Re: The Dylan Thread

Postby Aquarian-Time » Thu Sep 24, 2015 2:12 pm

Gonna make my Dylan live debut at The Apollo in Manchester in October, £78 wow... anyhow my mate got 2 tickets and I thought it is someone I really need to see at least once, so I nabbed his extra.
Aquarian-Time
Known user
 
Posts: 536
Joined: Fri Jul 13, 2012 8:22 am

Re: The Dylan Thread

Postby The Dr » Thu Sep 24, 2015 3:50 pm

£95.92 preordr amazon
£39.99 mp3

plus



Collector's Edition

Limited, numbered edition of 5,000 units worldwide These will be the only copies of the Collector's Edition ever manufactured.
Every note recorded by Bob Dylan in the studio in 1965/1966
379 tracks on 18 discs
170 page hardcover 11” x 11” book
Certificate of authenticity

Also includes

The original nine mono 45 RPM singles released during the time period
A leopard skin printed spindle
A strip of film cells from an original print of the ‘Don’t Look Back’ film

Pre-Order Now Only Available on BobDylan.com


$599.99
“You're not Dostoevsky,' said the citizeness

'Well, who knows, who knows,' he replied.

'Dostoevsky's dead,' said the citizeness, but somehow not very confidently.

'I protest!' Behemoth exclaimed hotly. 'Dostoevsky is immortal!”
The Dr
Known user
 
Posts: 1355
Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2012 6:32 pm
Location: some forgotten memory/ midday of eternity

Re: The Dylan Thread

Postby The Dr » Thu Sep 24, 2015 3:51 pm

runaway wrote:I can barely get through an entire Dylan album, never mind 7+ hours of the stuff!


hmm sounds like you should get the limited 18 dsic version including 'every note recorded'
“You're not Dostoevsky,' said the citizeness

'Well, who knows, who knows,' he replied.

'Dostoevsky's dead,' said the citizeness, but somehow not very confidently.

'I protest!' Behemoth exclaimed hotly. 'Dostoevsky is immortal!”
The Dr
Known user
 
Posts: 1355
Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2012 6:32 pm
Location: some forgotten memory/ midday of eternity

Re: The Dylan Thread

Postby TheWarmth » Thu Sep 24, 2015 4:30 pm

18 Disc Tracklist:

Disc 1
1. Love Minus Zero/No Limit – Take 1 (1/13/1965) Breakdown.
2. Love Minus Zero/No Limit – Take 2 (1/13/1965) Complete.
3. I’ll Keep It With Mine – Take 1 (1/13/1965) Released on Biograph, 1985.
4. It’s All Over Now, Baby Blue – Take 1 (1/13/1965) Released on The Bootleg Series, Vol. 7, 2005.
5. Bob Dylan’s 115th Dream – Take 1 (1/13/1965) Fragment. Released on Bringing It All Back Home, 1965.
6. Bob Dylan’s 115th Dream – Take 2 (1/13/1965) Complete.
7. She Belongs To Me – Take 1 (1/13/1965) Complete.
8. Subterranean Homesick Blues – Take 1 (1/13/1965) Released on The Bootleg Series, Vol. 1-3, 1991.
9. Outlaw Blues – Take 1 (1/13/1965) Complete.
10. On The Road Again – Take 1 (1/13/1965) Complete.
11. Farewell Angelina – Take 1 (1/13/1965) Released on Bootleg Series, Vol. 1-3, 1991.
12. If You Gotta Go, Go Now – Take 1 (1/13/1965) Complete.
13. You Don’t Have to Do That – Take 1 (1/13/1965) Incomplete.
14. California – Take 1 (1/13/1965) Complete.
15. Love Minus Zero/No Limit – Take 3 remake (1/13/1965) Complete.
16. She Belongs To Me – Take 2 remake (1/13/1965) Complete.
17. Outlaw Blues – Take 1 remake (1/13/1965) False start.
18. Outlaw Blues – Take 2 remake (1/13/1965) Complete.
19. Love Minus Zero/No Limit – Take 1 remake (1/14/1965) Complete.
20. Love Minus Zero/No Limit – Take 2 remake (1/14/1965) Released on Bringing It All Back Home, 1965.
21. Love Minus Zero/No Limit – (1/14/1965) Insert.
22. Subterranean Homesick Blues – Take 1 remake (1/14/1965) Complete.
23. Subterranean Homesick Blues – Take 2 remake (1/14/1965) False start.
24. Subterranean Homesick Blues – Take 3 remake (1/14/1965) Released on Bringing It All Back Home, 1965.
25. Outlaw Blues – Take 1 remake (1/14/1965) False start.
26. Outlaw Blues – Take 2 remake (1/14/1965) Fragment/breakdown.
27. Outlaw Blues – Take 3 remake (1/14/1965) Released on Bringing It All Back Home, 1965.


Disc 2
1. She Belongs To Me – Take 1 remake (1/14/1965) Complete.
2. She Belongs To Me – Take 2 remake (1/14/1965) Released on Bringing It All Back Home, 1965.
3. Bob Dylan’s 115th Dream – Take 1 (1/14/1965) False start.
4. Bob Dylan’s 115th Dream – Take 2 (1/14/1965) Released on Bringing It All Back Home, 1965.
5. On The Road Again – Take 1 (1/14/1965) False start.
6. On The Road Again – Take 2 (1/14/1965) Complete.
7. On The Road Again – Take 3 (1/14/1965) False start.
8. On The Road Again – Take 4 (1/14/1965) Complete.
9. Maggie’s Farm – Take 1 (1/15/1965) Released on Bringing It All Back Home, 1965.
10. On The Road Again – Take 1 remake (1/15/1965) Complete.
11. On The Road Again – Takes 2-6 remake (1/15/1965) False starts/complete.
12. On The Road Again – Take 7 remake (1/15/1965) Complete.
13. On The Road Again – Takes 8-9 remake (1/15/1965) False starts.
14. On The Road Again – Take 11 remake (1/15/1965) False start.
15. On The Road Again – Take 12 remake (1/15/1965) False start.
16. On The Road Again – Take 13 remake (1/15/1965) Released on Bringing It All Back Home, 1965.
17. It’s Alright, Ma (I’m Only Bleeding) – Take 1 (1/15/1965) False start.
18. It’s Alright, Ma (I’m Only Bleeding) – Take 2 (1/15/1965) Released on Bringing It All Back Home, 1965.
19. Gates Of Eden – Take 1 (1/15/1965) Released on Bringing It All Back Home, 1965.
20. Mr. Tambourine Man – Takes 1-2 (1/15/1965) False starts.
21. Mr. Tambourine Man – Take 3 (1/15/1965) Breakdown.
22. Mr. Tambourine Man – Takes 4-5 (1/15/1965) Breakdown.
23. Mr. Tambourine Man – Take 6 (1/15/1965) Released on Bringing It All Back Home, 1965.
24. It’s All Over Now, Baby Blue – Take 1 remake (1/15/1965) Released on Bringing It All Back Home, 1965.


Disc 3
1. If You Gotta Go, Go Now – Take 1 (1/15/1965) Complete.
2. If You Gotta Go, Go Now – Take 2 (1/15/1965) Complete.
3. If You Gotta Go, Go Now – Take 3 (1/15/1965) Complete.
4. If You Gotta Go, Go Now – Take 4 (1/15/1965) Released on The Bootleg Series, Vol. 1-3, 1991.
5. It Takes A Lot To Laugh, It Takes A Train To Cry – Take 1 (6/15/1965) Complete.
6. It Takes A Lot To Laugh, It Takes A Train To Cry – Takes 2-3 (6/15/1965) Fragments.
7. It Takes A Lot To Laugh, It Takes A Train To Cry – Take 4 (6/15/1965) Breakdown.
8. It Takes A Lot To Laugh, It Takes A Train To Cry – Takes 5 (6/15/1965) False start.
9. It Takes A Lot To Laugh, It Takes A Train To Cry – Takes 6 (6/15/1965) Breakdown.
10. It Takes A Lot To Laugh, It Takes A Train To Cry – Take 7 (6/15/1965) Insert.
11. It Takes A Lot To Laugh, It Takes A Train To Cry – Take 8 (6/15/1965) Complete.
12. It Takes A Lot To Laugh, It Takes A Train To Cry – Take 9 (6/15/1965) Released on The Bootleg Series, Vol. 7, 2005.
13. Sitting On A Barbed-Wire Fence – Take 1 (6/15/1965) Rehearsal and breakdown.
14. Sitting On A Barbed-Wire Fence – Take 2 (6/15/1965) Complete.
15. Sitting On A Barbed-Wire Fence – Take 3 (6/15/1965) Released on The Bootleg Series, Vol. 1-3, 1991.
16. Sitting On A Barbed-Wire Fence – Take 2 (6/15/1965) Edited version. Complete.
17. It Takes A Lot to Laugh, It Takes A Train To Cry – Take 1 remake (6/15/1965) Released on The Bootleg Series, Vol. 1-3, 1991.
18. Sitting On A Barbed-Wire Fence – Takes 4-5 (6/15/1965) False starts.
19. Sitting On A Barbed-Wire Fence – Take 6 (6/15/1965) Complete.
20. Like A Rolling Stone – Takes 1-3 (6/15/1965) Rehearsal.
21. Like A Rolling Stone – Take 4 (6/15/1965) Rehearsal. Partially released on The Bootleg Series Vol. 1-3, 1991.
22. Like A Rolling Stone – Take 5 (6/15/1965) Breakdown.


Disc 4
1. Like A Rolling Stone – Rehearsal remake (6/16/1965) Rehearsal.
2. Like A Rolling Stone – Take 1 remake (6/16/1965) Rehearsal.
3. Like A Rolling Stone – Takes 2-3 remake (6/16/1965) False starts.
4. Like A Rolling Stone – Take 4 remake (6/16/1965) Released on Highway 61 Revisited, 1965.
5. Like A Rolling Stone – Take 5 remake (6/16/1965) Rehearsal.
6. Like A Rolling Stone – Take 6 remake (6/16/1965) False start.
7. Like A Rolling Stone – Take 8 remake (6/16/1965) Breakdown.
8. Like A Rolling Stone – Takes 9-10 remake (6/16/1965) False starts.
9. Like A Rolling Stone – Take 11 remake (6/16/1965) Complete.
10. Like A Rolling Stone – Take 12 remake (6/16/1965) False start.
11. Like A Rolling Stone – Take 13 remake (6/16/1965) Breakdown.
12. Like A Rolling Stone – Take 14 remake (6/16/1965) False start.
13. Like A Rolling Stone – Take 15 remake (6/16/1965) Breakdown.
14. Like A Rolling Stone – (6/16/1965) Master take, guitar.
15. Like A Rolling Stone – (6/16/1965) Master take, vocals, guitar (BD).
16. Like A Rolling Stone – (6/16/1965) Master take, piano, bass.
17. Like A Rolling Stone – (6/16/1965) Master take, drums, organ.


Disc 5
1. It Takes A Lot To Laugh, It Takes A Train To Cry – Take 1 (7/29/1965) Breakdown.
2. It Takes A Lot To Laugh, It Takes A Train To Cry – Take 2 (7/29/1965) False start.
3. It Takes A Lot To Laugh, It Takes A Train To Cry – Take 3 (7/29/1965) Incomplete.
4. Tombstone Blues – Take 1 (7/29/1965) Complete.
5. Tombstone Blues – Takes 2-3 (7/29/1965) False starts.
6. Tombstone Blues – Take 4 (7/29/1965) Complete.
7. Tombstone Blues – Takes 5-7 (7/29/1965) False starts, rehearsal.
8. Tombstone Blues – Take 9 (7/29/1965) Released on The Bootleg Series, Vol. 7, 2005.
9. Tombstone Blues – Take 10 (7/29/1965) False start.
10. Tombstone Blues – Take 11 (7/29/1965) Breakdown.
11. Tombstone Blues – Take 12 (7/29/1965) Released on Highway 61 Revisited, 1965.
12. It Takes A Lot To Laugh, It Takes A Train To Cry – Take 1 (7/29/1965) Complete.
13. It Takes A Lot To Laugh, It Takes A Train To Cry – Take 2 (7/29/1965) False start.
14. It Takes A Lot To Laugh, It Takes A Train To Cry – Take 3 (7/29/1965) Complete.
15. It Takes A Lot To Laugh, It Takes A Train To Cry – Take 4 (7/29/1965) Released on Highway 61 Revisited, 1965.
16. Positively 4th Street – Takes 1-3 (7/29/1965) False starts.
17. Positively 4th Street – Take 4 (7/29/1965) Complete.
18. Positively 4th Street – Take 5 (7/29/1965) Complete.
19. Positively 4th Street – Take 6 (7/29/1965) Breakdown.
20. Positively 4th Street – Take 7 (7/29/1965) Breakdown.
21. Positively 4th Street – Take 8 (7/29/1965) Breakdown.
22. Positively 4th Street – Take 10 (7/29/1965) Breakdown.
23. Positively 4th Street – Take 12 (7/29/1965) Released as a single, 1965.


Disc 6
1. Desolation Row – Take 1 (7/29/1965) Released on The Bootleg Series Vol. 7, 2005.
2. From A Buick 6 – Take 1 (7/30/1965) False start.
3. From A Buick 6 – Take 2 (7/30/1965) False start.
4. From A Buick 6 – Take 4 (7/30/1965) Accidentally released on the first pressing of Highway 61 Revisited, 1965.
5. From A Buick 6 – Take 5 (7/30/1965) Released on Highway 61 Revisited, 1965.
6. Can You Please Crawl Out Your Window? – Takes 1-4 (7/30/1965) False starts.
7. Can You Please Crawl Out Your Window? – Take 1 (7/30/1965) Complete.
8. Can You Please Crawl Out Your Window? – Take 2 (7/30/1965) False start.
9. Can You Please Crawl Out Your Window? – Take 3 (7/30/1965) Complete.
10. Can You Please Crawl Out Your Window? – Take 4 (7/30/1965) False start.
11. Can You Please Crawl Out Your Window? – Take 5 (7/30/1965) Complete.
12. Can You Please Crawl Out Your Window? – Take 6 (7/30/1965) Rehearsal/false start.
13. Can You Please Crawl Out Your Window? – Take 7 (7/30/1965) False start.
14. Can You Please Crawl Out Your Window? – Take 8 (7/30/1965) False start.
15. Can You Please Crawl Out Your Window? – Takes 10-11 (7/30/1965) False starts.
16. Can You Please Crawl Out Your Window? – Take 12 (7/30/1965) Complete.
17. Can You Please Crawl Out Your Window? – Take 14 (7/30/1965) Breakdown.
18. Can You Please Crawl Out Your Window? – Take 15 (7/30/1965) Breakdown.
19. Can You Please Crawl Out Your Window? – Take 17 (7/30/1965) Accidentally Released as B-side of first pressing of Positively 4th Street single.
20. Highway 61 Revisited – Take 1 (8/02/1965) False start.
21. Highway 61 Revisited – Take 2 (8/02/1965) False start.
22. Highway 61 Revisited – Take 3 (8/02/1965) Complete.
23. Highway 61 Revisited – Take 4 (8/02/1965) False start.
24. Highway 61 Revisited – Take 5 (8/02/1965) Complete.
25. Highway 61 Revisited – Take 5 (mis-slate) (8/02/1965) Complete.
26. Highway 61 Revisited – Take 6 (8/02/1965) Released on The Bootleg Series, Vol. 7, 2005.
27. Highway 61 Revisited – Take 7 (8/02/1965) False start.
28. Highway 61 Revisited – Take 8 (8/02/1965) False start.
29. Highway 61 Revisited – Take 9 (8/02/1965) Released on Highway 61 Revisited, 1965.


Disc 7
1. Just Like Tom Thumb’s Blues – Take 1 (8/02/1965) Breakdown.
2. Just Like Tom Thumb’s Blues – Take 3 (8/02/1965) Complete.
3. Just Like Tom Thumb’s Blues – Take 4 (8/02/1965) Rehearsal.
4. Just Like Tom Thumb’s Blues – Take 5 (8/02/1965) Released on The Bootleg Series Vol. 7, 2005.
5. Just Like Tom Thumb’s Blues – Takes 9-10 (8/02/1965) Breakdown.
6. Just Like Tom Thumb’s Blues – Takes 11-12 (8/02/1965) False starts.
7. Just Like Tom Thumb’s Blues – Take 13 (8/02/1965) Complete.
8. Just Like Tom Thumb’s Blues – Takes 14-15 (8/02/1965) False starts.
9. Just Like Tom Thumb’s Blues – Take 16 (8/02/1965) Released on Highway 61 Revisited, 1965.
10. Queen Jane Approximately – Take 1 (8/02/1965) Rehearsal.
11. Queen Jane Approximately – Take 2 (8/02/1965) Complete.
12. Queen Jane Approximately – Take 3 (8/02/1965) False start.
13. Queen Jane Approximately – Take 4 (8/02/1965) False start.
14. Queen Jane Approximately – Take 5 (8/02/1965) Complete.
15. Queen Jane Approximately – Take 6 (8/02/1965) Complete.
16. Queen Jane Approximately – Take 7 (8/02/1965) Released on Highway 61 Revisited, 1965.
17. Ballad Of A Thin Man – Take 1 (8/02/1965) False start.
18. Ballad Of A Thin Man – Take 2 (8/02/1965) Breakdown.
19. Ballad Of A Thin Man – Take 3 (8/02/1965) Released on Highway 61 Revisited, 1965.
20. Ballad Of A Thin Man – Take 4 (8/02/1965) Insert.


Disc 8
1. Desolation Row – Takes 1-2 remake (8/02/1965) False start/breakdown.
2. Desolation Row – Take 3 remake (8/02/1965) Breakdown.
3. Desolation Row – Take 4 remake (8/02/1965) False start.
4. Desolation Row – Take 5 remake (8/02/1965) Complete.
5. Tombstone Blues – Take 1 (8/03/1965) Complete. Vocal overdub.
6. Tombstone Blues – Take 2 (8/03/1965) Complete. Vocal overdub.
7. Tombstone Blues – Take 3 (8/03/1965) Complete. Vocal overdub.
8. Desolation Row – Take 1 (8/04/1965) Rehearsal.
9. Desolation Row – Take 2 (8/04/1965) Rehearsal.
10. Desolation Row – Take 1 (8/04/1965) Complete (with insert).
11. Desolation Row – Take 5 (8/04/1965) Complete master without acoustic guitar overdub. Released on Highway 61 Revisited, 1965.
12. Desolation Row – Take 6 (8/04/1965) Guitar overdub.
13. Desolation Row – Take 7 (8/04/1965) Guitar overdub
14. Tombstone Blues – Take 1 (8/04/1965) Harmonica overdub.
15. Medicine Sunday – Take 1 (10/05/1965) Incomplete.
16. Medicine Sunday – Take 2 (10/05/1965) Incomplete.
17. Jet Pilot – Take 1 (10/05/1965) Released on Biograph, 1985.
18. I Wanna Be Your Lover – (10/05/1965) Rehearsal.
19. Can You Please Crawl Out Your Window? – Take 1 (10/05/1965) Fragment.
20. Can You Please Crawl Out Your Window? – Take 2 (10/05/1965) Fragment.


Disc 9
1. I Wanna Be Your Lover – Take 1 (10/05/1965) Fragment.
2. I Wanna Be Your Lover – Take 1 Edit 1 (10/05/1965) Complete.
3. I Wanna Be Your Lover – Take 1 Edit 2 (10/05/1965) Complete.
4. I Wanna Be Your Lover – Take 2 (10/05/1965) Complete.
5. I Wanna Be Your Lover – (10/05/1965) Rehearsal.
6. I Wanna Be Your Lover – Take 3 10/05/1965) Complete.
7. I Wanna Be Your Lover – Take 4 (10/05/1965) Complete.
8. I Wanna Be Your Lover – Take 5 (10/05/1965) Complete
9. I Wanna Be Your Lover – Take 6 (10/05/1965) Complete.
10. I Wanna Be Your Lover – Take 6 (mis-slate) (10/05/1965) Released on Biograph, 1985.
11. Instrumental – Take 1 (10/05/1965) Fragment.
12. Instrumental – Take 2 (10/05/1965) Complete.
13. Visions Of Johanna – Take 1 (11/30/1965) Rehearsal.
14. Visions Of Johanna – Take 2 (11/30/1965) Rehearsal.
15. Visions Of Johanna – Take 3 (11/30/1965) Rehearsal.
16. Visions Of Johanna – Take 4 (11/30/1965) Complete.
17. Visions Of Johanna – Take 5 (11/30/1965) Complete.
18. Visions Of Johanna – Take 6 (11/30/1965) Rehearsal.
19. Visions Of Johanna – Take 7 (11/30/1965) Complete.
20. Visions Of Johanna – Take 8 (11/30/1965) Released on The Bootleg Series, Vol.7, 2005.


Disc 10
1. Visions Of Johanna – Takes 9-12 (11/30/1965) False starts.
2. Visions Of Johanna – Take 13 (11/30/1965) Breakdown.
3. Visions Of Johanna – Take 14 (11/30/1965) Complete.
4. Can You Please Crawl Out Your Window? – Take 1 (11/30/1965) False start.
5. Can You Please Crawl Out Your Window? – Take 2 (11/30/1965) False start, rehearsal.
6. Can You Please Crawl Out Your Window? – Take 3 (11/30/1965) False start.
7. Can You Please Crawl Out Your Window? – Take 4 (11/30/1965) False start, rehearsal.
8. Can You Please Crawl Out Your Window? – Take 6 (11/30/1965) Complete.
9. Can You Please Crawl Out Your Window? – Take 7 (11/30/1965) Breakdown.
10. Can You Please Crawl Out Your Window? – Take 8 (11/30/1965) Complete.
11. Can You Please Crawl Out Your Window? – Take 9 (11/30/1965) False start.
12. Can You Please Crawl Out Your Window? – Take 10 (11/30/1965) Released as a single in October, 1965.
13. She’s Your Lover Now – Take 1 (1/21/1966) Breakdown.
14. She’s Your Lover Now – Take 2 (1/21/1966) Rehearsal.
15. She’s Your Lover Now – Take 3 (1/21/1966) Breakdown.
16. She’s Your Lover Now – Take 4 (1/21/1966) Incomplete.
17. She’s Your Lover Now – Take 5 (1/21/1966) Rehearsal.
18. She’s Your Lover Now – Take 6 (1/21/1966) Complete.
19. She’s Your Lover Now – Take 7 (1/21/1966) False start.
20. She’s Your Lover Now – Take 8 (1/21/1966) Rehearsal.
21. She’s Your Lover Now – Take 9 (1/21/1966) Rehearsal.
22. She’s Your Lover Now – Takes 10-11 (1/21/1966) Rehearsal.
23. She’s Your Lover Now – Take 12 (1/21/1966) Rehearsal.
24. She’s Your Lover Now – Take 13 (1/21/1966) Rehearsal.


Disc 11
1. She’s Your Lover Now – Take 14 (1/21/1966) Breakdown.
2. She’s Your Lover Now – Take 15 (1/21/1966) Released on The Bootleg Series, Vol. 1-3, 1991.
3. She’s Your Lover Now – (1/21/1966) Rehearsal.
4. She’s Your Lover Now – Take 16 (1/21/1966) Complete.
5. Leopard-Skin Pill-Box Hat – Take 1 (1/25/1966) Released on The Bootleg Series, Vol. 7, 2005.
6. Leopard-Skin Pill-Box Hat – Take 2 (1/25/1966) Complete.
7. One Of Us Must Know (Sooner Or Later) – Take 1 (1/25/1966) Rehearsal.
8. One Of Us Must Know (Sooner Or Later) – Take 2 (1/25/1966) Rehearsal.
9. One Of Us Must Know (Sooner Or Later) – Take 3 (1/25/1966) Fragment.
10. One Of Us Must Know (Sooner Or Later) – Take 4 (1/25/1966) Rehearsal.
11. One Of Us Must Know (Sooner Or Later) – Take 5 (1/25/1966) Rehearsal.
12. One Of Us Must Know (Sooner Or Later) – Takes 6-8 (1/25/1966) Rehearsal.
13. One Of Us Must Know (Sooner Or Later) – Take 9 (1/25/1966) Rehearsal.
14. One Of Us Must Know (Sooner Or Later) – Takes 10-14 (1/25/1966) Rehearsal.
15. One Of Us Must Know (Sooner Or Later) – Take 15 (1/25/1966) Complete.
16. One Of Us Must Know (Sooner Or Later) – Takes 16-17 (1/25/1966) False starts.
17. One Of Us Must Know (Sooner Or Later) – Take 18 (1/25/1966) Complete.
18. One Of Us Must Know (Sooner Or Later) – (1/25/1966) Rehearsal.
19. One Of Us Must Know (Sooner Or Later) – Take 19 (1/25/1966) Complete.
20. One Of Us Must Know (Sooner Or Later) – Takes 21-22 (1/25/1966) Breakdown.


Disc 12
1. One Of Us Must Know (Sooner Or Later) – Take 23 (1/25/1966) Complete.
2. One Of Us Must Know (Sooner Or Later) – Take 24 (1/25/1966) Released on Blonde On Blonde, 1966.
3. One Of Us Must Know (Sooner Or Later) – (1/25/1966) Master take, guitar (BD) and organ.
4. One Of Us Must Know (Sooner Or Later) – (1/25/1966) Master take, vocal.
5. One Of Us Must Know (Sooner Or Later) – (1/25/1966) Master take, piano and drums.
6. One Of Us Must Know (Sooner Or Later) – (1/25/1966) Master take, guitar and bass.
7. Lunatic Princess – Take 1 (1/27/1966) Incomplete.
8. Leopard-Skin Pill-Box Hat – Takes 1-2 (1/27/1966) False start, incomplete.
9. Leopard-Skin Pill-Box Hat – (1/27/1966) Insert.
10. I’ll Keep It With Mine – (no date listed) Rehearsal. Partially released on The Bootleg Series, Vol.1-3, 1991.
11. Fourth Time Around – Take 1 (2/14/1966) Rehearsal.
12. Fourth Time Around – Take 2 (2/14/1966) Breakdown.
13. Fourth Time Around – Takes 3-4 (2/14/1966) Rehearsal.
14. Fourth Time Around – Take 5 (2/14/1966) Complete.
15. Fourth Time Around – Takes 6-7 (2/14/1966) Rehearsal.
16. Fourth Time Around – Take 8 (2/14/1966) Rehearsal.
17. Fourth Time Around – Takes 9-10 (2/14/1966) False starts.


Disc 13
1. Fourth Time Around – Take 11 (2/14/1966) Complete.
2. Fourth Time Around – Takes 12-13 (2/14/1966) False starts.
3. Fourth Time Around – Takes 14-16 (2/14/1966) False starts.
4. Fourth Time Around – Takes 17-18 (2/14/1966) False starts.
5. Fourth Time Around – Take 19 (2/14/1966) Breakdown.
6. Fourth Time Around – Take 19 again (2/14/1966) Released on Blonde On Blonde, 1966.
7. Visions Of Johanna – Take 1 (2/14/1966) False start.
8. Visions Of Johanna – Take 2 (2/14/1966) Breakdown.
9. Visions Of Johanna – Take 3 (2/14/1966) False start.
10. Visions Of Johanna – Take 4 (2/14/1966) Released on Blonde On Blonde, 1966.
11. Leopard-Skin Pill-Box Hat – Takes 1-2 (2/14/1966) Rehearsal.
12. Leopard-Skin Pill-Box Hat – Take 3 (2/14/1966) Complete.
13. Leopard-Skin Pill-Box Hat – Takes 4-5 (2/14/1966) Rehearsal.
14. Leopard-Skin Pill-Box Hat – Take 6 (2/14/1966) Breakdown.
15. Leopard-Skin Pill-Box Hat – Take 6 again (2/14/1966) Rehearsal.
16. Leopard-Skin Pill-Box Hat – Take 8 (2/14/1966) Complete.
17. Leopard-Skin Pill-Box Hat – Take 9 (2/14/1966) Breakdown.
18. Leopard-Skin Pill-Box Hat – Take 10 (2/14/1966) False start.
19. Leopard-Skin Pill-Box Hat – Take 11 (2/14/1966) Breakdown.
20. Leopard-Skin Pill-Box Hat – Take 12 (2/14/1966) False start.
21. Leopard-Skin Pill-Box Hat – Take 13 (2/14/1966) Complete.
22. I’ll Keep It With Mine (instrumental) – Take 1 (2/15/1966) Rehearsal.
23. I’ll Keep It With Mine (instrumental) – Take 2 (2/15/1966) Rehearsal.
24. I’ll Keep It With Mine (instrumental) – Take 3 (2/15/1966) Rehearsal.
25. I’ll Keep It With Mine (instrumental) – Take 4 (2/15/1966) Rehearsal.
26. I’ll Keep It With Mine (instrumental) – Take 5 (2/15/1966) Rehearsal.
27. I’ll Keep It With Mine (instrumental) – Takes 6-7 (2/15/1966) Rehearsal.
28. I’ll Keep It With Mine (instrumental) – Take 8 (2/15/1966) Rehearsal.
29. I’ll Keep It With Mine (instrumental) – Take 8 again (2/15/1966) Complete.
30. I’ll Keep It With Mine (instrumental) – Take 9 (2/15/1966) Complete.


Disc 14
1. Sad-Eyed Lady Of The Lowlands – Take 1 (2/16/1966) Complete.
2. Sad-Eyed Lady Of The Lowlands – Take 2 (2/16/1966) Rehearsal.
3. Sad-Eyed Lady Of The Lowlands – Take 3 (2/16/1966) Complete.
4. Sad-Eyed Lady Of The Lowlands – Take 4 (2/16/1966) Released on Blonde On Blonde, 1966.
5. Stuck Inside Of Mobile With The Memphis Blues Again – Take 1 (2/17/1966) Rehearsal.
6. Stuck Inside Of Mobile With The Memphis Blues Again – (2/17/1966) Rehearsal.
7. Stuck Inside Of Mobile With The Memphis Blues Again – Take 1 (2/17/1966) Breakdown.
8. Stuck Inside Of Mobile With The Memphis Blues Again – Takes 2-3 (2/17/1966) Rehearsal.
9. Stuck Inside Of Mobile With The Memphis Blues Again – Take 4 (2/17/1966) Breakdown.
10. Stuck Inside Of Mobile With The Memphis Blues Again – Take 4 (mis-slate) (2/17/1966) False start.
11. Stuck Inside Of Mobile With The Memphis Blues Again – Take 5 (2/17/1966) Released on The Bootleg Series, Vol. 7, 2005.
12. Stuck Inside Of Mobile With The Memphis Blues Again – Takes 6-8 (2/17/1966) False starts.
13. Stuck Inside Of Mobile With The Memphis Blues Again – Take 9 (2/17/1966) Breakdown.
14. Stuck Inside Of Mobile With The Memphis Blues Again – Take 10 (2/17/1966) False start.
15. Stuck Inside Of Mobile With The Memphis Blues Again – Takes 11-12 (2/17/1966) Breakdown.
16. Stuck Inside Of Mobile With The Memphis Blues Again – Take 13 (2/17/1966) Breakdown.


Disc 15
1. Stuck Inside Of Mobile With The Memphis Blues Again – Take 14 (2/17/1966) Complete.
2. Stuck Inside Of Mobile With The Memphis Blues Again – Take 15 (2/17/1966) Released on Blonde On Blonde, 1966.
3. Absolutely Sweet Marie – (3/07/1966) Rehearsal.
4. Absolutely Sweet Marie – Take 1 (3/07/1966) Complete.
5. Absolutely Sweet Marie – Take 2 (3/07/1966) False start.
6. Absolutely Sweet Marie – Take 3 (3/07/1966) Released on Blonde On Blonde, 1966.
7. Absolutely Sweet Marie – (3/07/1966) Insert.
8. Just Like A Woman – Take 1 (3/08/1966) Complete.
9. Just Like A Woman – Take 2 (3/08/1966) Complete.
10. Just Like A Woman – Take 3 (3/08/1966) Complete.
11. Just Like A Woman – Take 4 (3/08/1966) Complete.
12. Pledging My Time – Take 1 (3/08/1966) Breakdown.
13. Pledging My Time – (3/08/1966) Rehearsal.
14. Pledging My Time – Take 2 (3/08/1966) False start.
15. Pledging My Time – Take 3 (3/08/1966) Released on Blonde On Blonde, 1966.
16. Just Like A Woman – Take 5 (3/08/1966) False start.
17. Just Like A Woman – Take 6 (3/08/1966) Breakdown.

Disc 16
1. Just Like A Woman – Take 8 (3/08/1966) Complete.
2. Just Like A Woman – Takes 9-10 (3/08/1966) False start, breakdown.
3. Just Like A Woman – Takes 11-12 (3/08/1966) Rehearsal.
4. Just Like A Woman – Take 13 (3/08/1966) Breakdown.
5. Just Like A Woman – Takes 14-15 (3/08/1966) Rehearsal.
6. Just Like A Woman – Take 16 (3/08/1966) Complete.
7. Just Like A Woman – Take 17 (3/08/1966) Breakdown.
8. Just Like A Woman – Take 18 (3/08/1966) Released on Blonde On Blonde, 1966.
9. Most Likely You Go Your Way (And I’ll Go Mine) – Take 1 (3/09/1966) Complete.
10. Most Likely You Go Your Way (And I’ll Go Mine) – Take 2 (3/09/1966) Rehearsal.
11. Most Likely You Go Your Way (And I’ll Go Mine) – Take 3 (3/09/1966) Rehearsal.
12. Most Likely You Go Your Way (And I’ll Go Mine) – Take 4 (3/09/1966) Rehearsal.
13. Most Likely You Go Your Way (And I’ll Go Mine) – Take 5 (3/09/1966) Breakdown.
14. Most Likely You Go Your Way (And I’ll Go Mine) – Take 6 (3/09/1966) Released on Blonde on Blonde, 1966.
15. Temporary Like Achilles – Take 1 (3/09/1966) Complete.
16. Temporary Like Achilles – Take 2 (3/09/1966) False start
17. Temporary Like Achilles – Take 3 (3/09/1966) Complete.
18. Temporary Like Achilles – Take 4 (3/09/1966) Released on Blonde On Blonde, 1966.
19. Rainy Day Women #12 & 35 – (3/10/1966) Rehearsal.
20. Rainy Day Women #12 & 35 – Take 1 (3/10/1966) Released on Blonde On Blonde, 1966.

Disc 17
1. Obviously Five Believers – Take 1 (3/10/1966) False start.
2. Obviously Five Believers – Take 2 (3/10/1966) Breakdown.
3. Obviously Five Believers – Take 3 (3/10/1966) Complete.
4. Obviously Five Believers – Take 4 (3/10/1966) Released on Blonde On Blonde, 1966.
5. Leopard-Skin Pill-Box Hat – Take 1 (3/10/1966) Released on Blonde On Blonde, 1966.
6. I Want You – (3/10/1966) Rehearsal.
7. I Want You – Take 1 (3/10/1966) Complete.
8. I Want You – Take 2 (3/10/1966) Breakdown.
9. I Want You – Take 3 (3/10/1966) Rehearsal, false start.
10. I Want You – Take 4 (3/10/1966) Complete.
11. I Want You – Take 5 (3/10/1966) Released on Blonde On Blonde, 1966.
12. I Want You – Take 5b (3/10/1966) Insert, guitar overdub.


Disc 18
1. Remember Me – (5/04/1965) Savoy Hotel, London.
2. More And More – (5/04/1965) Savoy Hotel, London.
3. Blues Stay Away From Me – (5/04/1965) Savoy Hotel, London.
4. Weary Blues From Waitin’ – (5/04/1965) Savoy Hotel, London.
5. Lost Highway – (5/04/65) Savoy Hotel, London.
6. I’m So Lonesome I Could Cry – (5/04/1965) Savoy Hotel, London.
7. Young But Daily Growing – (5/04/1965) Savoy Hotel, London.
8. Wild Mountain Thyme – (5/04/1965) Savoy Hotel, London.
9. I Can’t Leave Her Behind [1] – (5/13/1966) North British Station Hotel, Glasgow, Scotland.
10. I Can’t Leave Her Behind [2] – (5/13/1966) North British Station Hotel, Glasgow, Scotland.
11. On A Rainy Afternoon – (5/13/1966) North British Station Hotel, Glasgow, Scotland.
12. If I Was A King [1] – (5/13/1966) North British Station Hotel, Glasgow, Scotland.
13. If I Was A King [2] – (5/13/1966) North British Station Hotel, Glasgow, Scotland.
14. What Kind Of Friend Is This – (5/13/1966) North British Station Hotel, Glasgow, Scotland.
15. Positively Van Gogh [1] – (3/12/1966) Denver, Colorado Hotel Room.
16. Positively Van Gogh [2] – (3/12/1966) Denver, Colorado Hotel Room.
17. Positively Van Gogh [3] – (3/12/1966) Denver, Colorado Hotel Room.
18. Don’t Tell Him, Tell Me – (3/12/1966) Denver, Colorado Hotel Room.
19. If You Want My Love – (3/12/1966) Denver, Colorado Hotel Room.
20. Just Like A Woman – (3/12/1966) Denver, Colorado Hotel Room.
21. Sad-Eyed Lady Of The Lowlands – (3/12/1966) Denver, Colorado Hotel Room.
TheWarmth
Known user
 
Posts: 3666
Joined: Thu Jan 01, 1970 1:00 am
Location: Chicago, IL

Re: The Dylan Thread

Postby jack white » Thu Sep 24, 2015 5:33 pm

Jesus Mary & Joseph..
Lou: ... We're just out of balance
Betsy: you & me?
Lou: [the] whole world
jack white
Known user
 
Posts: 1673
Joined: Sat Jan 31, 2004 12:29 am
Location: Floor of the ocean

Re: The Dylan Thread

Postby The Dr » Sun Sep 27, 2015 7:10 pm

from bob johnston's auto bio- availble online for free

this is most of the stuff relevant to the new bootleg. i emailed the guy who compiled the interview/autobio and he replied, which was nice of him. so enjoy :D (i've only just started it so i dunno most of the stuff i just posted)

---


I got a picture of Charlie [Daniels] here. He and I were in a hurricane in North Carolina down there in Wilmington where he was, and there’s a picture of him and Charlie said, “When Bob Johnston brought Dylan to Nashville, it was a beginning of the Nashville horizons.” That’s what he said. And then he wrote this thing. He made it to the White House. Carter had him up there and he wrote this thing for us and he said, “Bob, we shared our cups and toasted our times and rot gut bourbon and fine French wine. Old friend, we been a mile or two together.” That’s more important than a damn gold record hanging on the wall.
Then this thing came along, John Bauldie’s liner notes to Bob Dylan: The Bootleg Series Vol. 1 – 3. In his notes on the song “I’ll Keep it with Mine” he noted, “Written mid-­1964 and given to Nico who recorded it on her first LP, Bob Dylan’s own solo piano version of the song was finally released in 1985 on Biograph. However, there is another version of the song, an attempt at recording it with backing musicians. It’s a particular treat to hear how the song scrapes its way into existence encouraged, it seems, by the promptings of producer, Bob Johnston. At first, there’s only Dylan’s fumbling piano, the initially absurd, irrelevant maracas, and a tentative, ghostly organ and bass. But, as if by magic, from the general disorder emerges a sudden, delicate coherence. As the musicians gain confidence, Dylan becomes gradually more assured of his singing and subsequently in his piano playing. What we end up with is a compelling inside look at how Blonde on Blonde sound was assembled.” ...If you can think about that.
There’s another one...It said...I love this thing...It meant an awful lot to me, probably more than anything. It said:

----

Highway 61 revisited
Producing Bob Dylan

[[Bob Johnston became established as a freelance producer at Columbia. He worked with Patti Page, Louie Armstrong and others. He wanted to work with Bob Dylan, Simon and Garfunkel and artists of that caliber. At first he was turned down but then legendary producer John Hammond intervened on Johnston’s behalf. Tom Wilson produced Bob Dylan’s first five albums. For reasons not entirely clear, Dylan’s manager Albert Grossman and Dylan decided to replace Wilson.
Work had already started on the album Highway 61 Revisited with Wilson having already produced "Like a Rolling Stone." Released as a single in July 1968, it broke into the top five on the singles sales chart in both the U.S. and U.K. Johnston taking over from Wilson, produced all the rest of the album's cuts. \ Released in Sept. 1965 Highway 61 Revisited was a hit.]]

Bob Johnston Meets Bob Dylan

John Hammond was my mentor. He was CBS. He was always in my corner, and every artist that I had I owe to John Hammond. There wasn't anybody else there that he gave a shit about, I was the only one. He said, "You got to do this one, and I got another one for you."
John Hammond, [Columbia Vice President and General Manager Bill] Gallagher, and I went to [Bob] Mersey. I said, "You've got to help me. I want Simon & Garfunkel, and I want Dylan. I want both of those acts.”
Mersey said, "What you want them people for man? They can't play, they smell," and so on.
I said "Screw you, I want 'em!" I was worried about Terry Melcher. Because he had the Byrds, Paul Revere, and I thought, "Oh man, I'm gonna have a hard time here." I went to all of them, including [Al] Grossman, who was Dylan's manager.
His producer was Tom Wilson then. Gallagher called me in the office said, "We're getting rid of Tom Wilson." He didn’t say why but maybe it was because Albert Grossman said he didn’t like him, and I don’t think Dylan liked him. I don’t know, but he never said anything about it.
Bill Gallagher, the Vice President, and John Hammond and all those people said . . .Gallagher said, “Don’t say anything about it.” He said, “We have two people in mind--you and”--the guy that did the Byrds--“Terry Melcher.” He said, “Those are the two we’ve got and we’re deciding right now.”
I went to Bob Mersey, who was Head of Music for CBS, Head of A&R. He recorded Barbara Streisand and Andy Williams--produced them, arranged them, did Tony Bennett and all of them. He was a big shot up there. John Hammond was my mentor and he ran CBS. I went to Mersey and Gallagher. I said, “I got to have both of those.”
Bob Mersey said, “What do you want those damn little jerks for?”
"Well, I've got to have them. If I don't I'm going to leave here."
“Why do you want to work with them for?” Mersey asked, “That guy can’t. . .” He said, “His fingernails are that long and he’s dirty.”—talking about Dylan.
“Man, I don’t want to talk about that.” I said. “Just get me. . …you know…Help me get those two artists.” I appealed to all of them.
Finally Gallagher said, “Okay, but don’t say anything to Tom Wilson.”
“That’s the only thing that we ask,” they said, “that you don’t say anything to Tom Wilson.” I said, “Good enough.”
The same afternoon, I went and had a drink with Tom. I told him that Grossman, Gallagher and all those people had told me they were going to fire him. And that it was between me and the guy on the West Coast out there--Terry Melcher—as to who was going to take over.
“Man, I know that anyway but”, Wilson said. “You’re a champ for telling me about it. Since it’s got to be somebody, it might as well be you. Anything I can do to help, let me know.”
“I will.”
They weren't going to give them to me. Then John Hammond got involved and they did.
First thing I knew I was walking into the studio. There was Dylan.
I walked out there, and said, "Bob, I'm Bob Johnston."
He said, "I'm Bob Dylan."
I said, "I know."
Shook hands with him. He looked up like he did in that western movie, Pat Garrett and Billy The Kid, like that, with that eye, like when he was a grocery clerk. Nicest person I ever met in my life.
Now someone once asked Dylan how he met me and he said, "I don’t know. One night, Wilson was there and the next night Johnston was there."

Recording Highway 61 Revisited

I have no idea, which was the first song I recorded? It was on Highway 61, but I wouldn't know what it was. No, that's why I want that book. There's a book with all the sessions Dylan did, list of the tracks and the times and shit like that, and I'll be able to tell.
Never had one word with Dylan. I didn't wait. I stepped in, I got the sound, and I got everything together.
The first thing out, after the first take, I said to Michael Bloomfield, "I can't hear Bob because you're standing next to him playing that thing."
He said, "I know, turn the damn thing down. Start moving people around."
I said right. I moved Dylan over here, and I while I was gone in the studio, he came over with Dylan. Dylan said, "Let me hear it."
I said, "Whatever you want." I turned it on, and about halfway through he said it sounds like shit. I said that's right. "It's always gonna sound like crap with him there," but I said, "you don't need me for that."
He said, "Why don't I sing, and you do whatever you do here."
I wouldn't want to quote that, I wouldn't want that used, but I'm telling you, because I don't want to say that. From that point on, we did one song, the first song, and I don't think he ever did a song twice in his life. Because I always had every tape machine rolling, had everything going.
He would play it live, but he wouldn't go to take two.
When recording Hammond would go in there, some of the others, "Take 14!! Hold it! Hold It!"
I never stayed in the booth. I got the sound I wanted, then I went into the studio with the musicians. I never stayed in the control booth.

HOW JOHNSTON RECORDED DYLAN

I didn't want Dylan standing around having to wait for dumb people to do things that should have been done already. I changed everything. When I originally got in there, the first thing they had, which was hilarious was an engineer sitting there in the recording booth.
Dylan, out there in the studio, would say, "Maybe we'll put one down."
I said, "Roll the tape."
The engineer turned around and called down the hallway, "Roll the tape".
There was an engineer standing about 30 feet away. "OK, roll it!" I heard him holler.
Next from way down the hallway, "Punch the button!"
Then, "NOW?"
Finally, I heard "Now, Now?" Almost scared, "Now?"
Dylan was already playing guitar, singing, the song. I said "Hold it".
"What's the matter? I was into my song,” Dylan asked.
I said "You're not gonna believe this! Come here!" I showed him.
I don't know what was said, but anyway, it was like, “Goddamn, what do we do?"
"Well, watch this." I went back there. I said, "Unplug that machine."
They said, "We can't unplug it."
I unplugged it.
"Well, you shouldn't do that because you're not an engineer," they said.
"Do you want me to roll it in there,” I responded, “or do you want to roll it in there?" I rolled the recording machine all the way down the hall, past the door to inside the studio. I came back and put two or three fans on it to keep it cool. I said, “You guys can sit over there in those chairs now. Four of them sat in the chairs.
"Roll the tape," I said.
The guy looked at me, said, "What do you mean?" I went over and punched the goddamn button.
The engineer said, "Sorry, but it's time to stop it."
"Screw it,” I said, “bring another machine in here, and just keep it rolling."
After that I always had two or three machines rolling; if the tape ran out on one, already I would be overlapping it. And that never happened again.

Song Lists

I never picked the song list. I never told anybody what to cut, how to cut, or anything. I just always told them what I thought. And most of it was “Damn, that’s great," because they didn't write anything bad!
I never could judge … "Well, what do you think of Dylan's last album?" I never could judge, because I love Dylan. He's a visionary to me, and everything he does should be recorded for history.

The Mystery of “Like A Rolling Stone”

"….Johnston's sound is nearly the opposite of [Producer Tom] Wilson's; the metal-on-metal screech of "Maggie's Farm" is the farthest thing from "It Takes A Lot to Laugh, It Takes a Train to Cry: or "Ballad of a Thin Man." Johnston's sound is not merely whole; song by song the sound is not the same, but it is always a thing in itself. There is a glow that seems to come from inside the music. It's what Johnston called "that Mountainside sound"….
-Greil Marcus taking about the differences between Dylan's first producer Tom Wilson and Bob Johnston in Like a Rolling Stone: Bob Dylan at the Crossroads1

Q & A About "Like a Rolling Stone"

LB: In Greil Marcus’ new book, he quotes you in such a way as to strongly suggest something for the first time that I recall – something you’ve always denied or sidestepped: that you remixed "Like a Rolling Stone" after Tom Wilson was done with it.
BJ: Did he say that in his book?
LB: He quotes you as saying that.
BJ: Well he shouldn’t have [starts laughing]. No, not that I remember.
You had "Rolling Stone," and then when I came along the sound was so different that I may have done it. But I can’t honestly tell you, "Yes, I did."
I don’t remember what happened back then, and Tom’s dead. He did a great job.
I think [Marcus] made a mistake, because I can’t see myself saying that, because of Tom. I loved Tom’ he was a nice guy.
The band Dylan was using had done "Like a Rolling Stone" together with Tom Wilson producing. They had the entire band, I didn't want to change the band, I had just come aboard.
All of a sudden, if you listen to what Dylan did before - everything changed. Listen to "Like a Rolling Stone", and then listen to everything else - everything was changing. - that's what I've always been told. Everything on the record sounded different than what "Stone" had sounded like. And everything on Paul's, and everything from then on.
I had been in a studio since I was four. I didn't go in there and say, "Well, what do you want me to do?" I went in there and messed with everybody's head, told everybody to do this and then to do that.

johnston's recording strategies
“The secret to Johnston’s success was perhaps best expressed by Johnny Cash in the film The Other Side of Nashville: "Bob Johnston is a producer that is an artist’s dream. Bob Johnston likes to sit back and watch an artist produce himself, and then he puts it together. Bob Johnston is smart enough to know when he gets an artist who believes in himself–to let him run with it."
-(Richard Younger, An Exclusive Interview with Bob Johnston, http://www.dylan.com/pages/samples/bobjohnston.html)

“It Wasn’t Art, All I Did Was Turn the Tape On.”


[[Perception Versus Reality: The fading historic take on Johnston's career most often claims that he was a nearly artless presence, serving almost more as a fan than a producer. He would simply turn on the tape and record the artist. In a sense, according to this version, the artists produced themselves.
This take on Johnston should come as no surprise because it is exactly his spin. Overly modest, Johnston is still the first to deride the importance of his own efforts.
"I never told anybody what to cut, how to cut, or anything. I just always told them what I thought. And most of it was “God damn, that’s great 'Cause they didn't write anything bad! I never could judge... 'Well, what do you think of Dylan's last album?" I never could judge, because I love Dylan, and he's a visionary to me, and everything he does should be recorded for history.
"It's that magic that happens. I think that all the other stuff is uncalled for. I probably am not involved in anything, and it wouldn't matter whether I was there or not. It's like your hands’ tingle, and you walk up. Cash says 'Get out of the damn way!' Willie walking up and down and all. They know what I think. It's always been total magic every time I've been in a studio. It doesn't matter who it's with, if it's a bad studio, or a toilet, or whatever."
The historical take on Johnston as well as his modesty leaves a truly extraordinary tale still to be told.
At least part of his genius is this strategic modesty in which he denies control and authorship. By minimizing his involvement he gives the artists more freedom and complete ownership of their work.
Unfortunately too many people bought what Bob was selling. People who believe no one in the industry on anything here take Bob at his word, especially music historians and critics.
Even when his undeniable credits are admired, his contributions are underplayed. As astute an observer as Richie Unterberger wrote (All Music, http://www.allmusic.com/artist/bob-johnston-p91272 - 23k) that if "…all he [Johnston] had done were the 1960s albums he produced for Bob Dylan, Bob Johnston would be a notable figure in rock history. He also did some of Simon & Garfunkel's most popular and important hit singles and albums, and worked with major singer-songwriters in rock, country, and folk music, from stars (Willie Nelson) to more specialized talents (Leonard Cohen, Loudon Wainwright III, Tracy Nelson), to downright cult figures (Dino Valente). There is surprisingly little information about Johnston dispensed by standard rock histories, and he has remained a fairly nondescript figure to the general public. Perhaps that's because he was a producer whose skill lay in organizing appropriate musicians for sessions, and in letting artists do their thing, rather than putting a distinct sonic imprint onto his releases."
This take is articulated even more specifically on a Bob Dylan fan web site (3 Mike Hobo Obviously 5 Producers”, http://www.positively-bobdylan.com/obvi ... -producers): "Unlike other producers Johnston never really created his own distinct style, he saw his own role in music production more in supporting the artist in doing whatever that artist wanted to do. Concerning his collaboration with Bob Dylan he was quoted saying: ""I don't really 'produce' his albums, but just do my best to make him smile when he leaves the studio"
Al Kooper who often seems to be trying to take credit for what it is generally acknowledged Bob did, wrote "Dropping the new bard into the screaming bastion of redneck land seemed like a stroke of genius from Bob Johnston, Dylan's new producer, but I suspect Johnston just longed for the comforts of home. Whatever, the results will last forever.”

-----


Blonde on Blonde – The Beginning

I wanted to do Leonard Cohen in Nashville. I think I ended up doing Dylan first down there, with Blonde on Blonde.
It came about …When Dylan wanted to record, he'd always pick up the phone, call me and say, "I've got some songs."
I'd go, "Great, man! When can I hear them, and what do you want to do??" because I was a Dylan freak. I never said, "Well, I don't like this," or "You shouldn't put this on the record," or any of that stuff. I think it's a joke when you tell talented people that.
It's like an aeronautical engineer that has never been to school telling you how to get a space shot in there. They can't. The record company people are and have always been attorneys and accountants. They can't sing, dance, play, write, entertain. They can't do anything except take the artists' money, which is what they have been doing since time began - since Jesus Christ days or before. They used to have to dance for the king. If he didn't like it, they killed them. Off with their heads!
Dylan said, "Well I was thinking of coming to Nashville."
"That's a great idea, Bob," I said.
Dylan came down to Nashville. Stayed at a hotel right by the railroad tracks, a Ramada Inn or some place like that.

Preparing for Recording Dylan

First, I had to deal with the studio itself. I started working in Studio B before I went into Studio A, because I wanted to fix it up right. I got one of the guys down there to work with me, got a saw, and cut all the different small recording rooms up. Put all the boards and other stuff out in the back, I had them haul it off. Then I had the locks on the doors changed. I went in there, and there was just this big, empty room which was perfect.
I recorded Dylan in Studio A. I went out, sat the drums up in the middle of the studio, against the wall. Put Dylan up, with a piece of glass, so he could see everybody. And everybody else - the bass amp was in one place, this amp was another. They were all out there standing together, playing and having great fun.
In advance I'd plan for the tape machines to keep rolling regardless, and I'd tune the studios for a perfect sound. As I've said, once we started recording Dylan doing a song, we didn't stop for any reason. If a certain section was rough or a problem, I'd note where it was. On the playback I'd tell the engineer to bring it down in that certain part so nobody could hear it. I knew I could always go back in when no one was even there and overdub a little thing.
When I started, I had decided to use a minimum of three microphones with Dylan, because if he wanted to jerk his head around or do like that with the guitar, I didn't want to lose him. You know it's like it's crazy and you can get more of the band's sound up. He didn't know any different.
Miking this way makes the band play louder. Because if you're on only one microphone, when you get ready to mix, you put Dylan's voice in the middle, you have to. So his voice is always in the middle.
When you bring the band up over here, you've got to bring his voice down, or you've got to bring the band down. You can't have the band covering his voice because you can only hear him this way. You can't hear him over here, really. You can just hear the band - the drums, the bass, and all like that.
Instead, I put mikes all around there. Walking anywhere in the studio, without the band, you can hear him anywhere you are. Then, you turn the band on, then you can raise it up four or five dB's, because you got his voice coming from all over.
I never knew anybody that ever did that, except me. I do know, the records, they're selling just as many, and they sound better than most of the albums do today. That's all I got to go by.
After it was recorded, I just mixed it. Then I'd go and play it for Dylan.

Blonde on Blonde – First Song

I think that the first song we recorded for Blonde on Blonde (I'm not sure, but I think it was the first one) was the best record I ever heard.
I had been to Nashville because I used to be a songwriter and my wife was a songwriter. We had about 50 or 60 hits. Had written 22, I think, Presley songs. I used to use a lot of musicians down here - Ray Stevens and Jerry Reed and all of those guys.
Man, that was just wonderful and there weren't any clocks. I did what I wanted to, and the reason that it happened is, when I first came down here, I got the "A" group if not the "A Team."1
I got Charlie McCoy, Wayne Moss, Kenny Buttrey, Pig Robbins, Jerry Kennedy, as well as Joe South.
Dylan showed up and went out into one of the studios there. He just stayed out there, and he never left to go to the bathroom or anything. He ate candy bar after candy bar, all kinds of sweets. All day long.
Now, these musicians down here in Nashville, they never had seen anything like these sessions. Usually, when they had a session it was around three hours and they recorded five songs or six songs.
After three hours Dylan hadn't left the studio he was in nor even stepped into the studio in which we were going to actually record. All the studio musicians had been there all day long. I told everybody, just stay around. Play Ping-Pong or even go to sleep as soundly as they could manage. Periodically I'd check on them, waking the sleeping ones up.
I did warn them then that when we did start recording, "You are only going to have one chance."
"If any of you quits playing for any reason, you're gone, because he'll never do that song again. I won't allow that. I'd rather sacrifice you then have him affected. I want to stay with him, because what he's got to say is important! More important than you will ever know! Important 30 or 40 years down the road or even 500 years down the road. I think he's the only prophet that we've had besides Christ or Buddha - whatever those guys names are!"
Dylan had been in that studio writing forever. I began thinking that he was a junkie, because he kept eating sweets, and chocolate, cokes, and different things like that. I had never seen anyone eat that much sugar. I thought, damn, he must really be hooked or something. I didn't care, but I thought he must be hooked. But he wasn't; he wasn't hooked on anything but time and space.
I don't know what time it was: two, three, four o'clock in the morning. Dylan finally came out, looked at me and said, "Hey Bob, you still awake?"
I said "yeah."
"Is there anyone else awake down there?" he asked. "Who is around you can get? I think I got something here."
"Yeah man," I said, going off to wake them.
They couldn't believe it. "What! We're going to record now?!"
"Yeah," I answered.
In about 20 minutes, they were all in there. There wasn't any turning the machines on. I always had them running. I had commandeered two machines on the way from Chicago. Got them and just turned one on after the other so I'd never lose anything that he had played.
"I got this song here, it goes like this," said Dylan "nnnn nnnn nnn - C G B," or something like that. The poor musicians were always looking at Dylan to see where he put his fingers - so they can play the next chord, because he'd say, "It goes like this: "AAAAad, ddddd, aaaa okay?" Then he'd be off.
That morning, when we finally got started, he walked back to his place in the back of the recording room. He counted off (nobody ever counted off for Dylan). He was back there, out of nowhere, with no warning suddenly, "Two, three!"- he started playing the guitar. Everybody else dove in on the song.
According to Wikipedia©ˆ, Ken Buttrey recalled, "[Dylan] ran down a verse and a chorus and he just quit and said, 'We'll do a verse and a chorus then I'll play my harmonica thing. Then we'll do another verse and a chorus then I'll play some more harmonica, and we'll see how it goes from there.' We were preparing ourselves dynamically for a basic two- to three-minute record because records just didn't go over three minutes. ... If you notice that record, that thing after like the second chorus starts building and building like crazy, and everybody's just peaking it up 'cause we thought, 'Man, this is it. ... This is gonna be the last chorus, and we've gotta put everything into it we can.' And he played another harmonica solo and went back down to another verse and the dynamics had to drop back down to a verse kind of feel. ... After about 10 minutes of this thing we're cracking up at each other, at what we were doing. I mean, we peaked five minutes ago. Where do we go from here?"
"We nailed "Sad Eyed Lady of the Lowlands' in one take," noted Johnston.

Other Blonde on Blonde Songs

"Sad-Eyed Lady" was the first song, unfortunately anything from that point on I don't really remember. All I know is I told the musicians, "Clear your mind because if you don't, I'm going to go back and use Grady and all those other players." [Johnston is referring to Grady Martin and the "A" Team.]
"Well, what do you want me to do?" They'd all say,
I'd go over there, all of them would be around and I'd say, "I want you to play this-'ding, ding, ding, ding' on C," to Jerry Reed.
He'd be, "Ding, ding," doing that. Then I'd have four five of them playing these simple stupid little damn things out there all together.
Finally one of them would catch on. "I ain't playing this goddamn thing on this record!" he'd go. Everybody would laugh. All I did was run a laugh fest. I don't ever remember not having a good time in the studio. If it was, I was gone, because you can't make music like that.
Dylan would go into the studio, play a song. After the take was finished he would ask, "What do you think?"
I said, "What difference does it make what anybody thinks? That's a goddamn joke."
"Man, I know it's a joke," he'd answer and then, you know, he'd go on like this.
That's what started that, the rest of the eight years we worked together he'd ask me, "Bob, what do you think?"
I'd go, "Damn, what do I know, who cares?"
We'd laugh.
Twenty minutes later he would come back. Then I might go, "Well, what if you did this? Or what if you did that?"
After a take, maybe the second, maybe the fourth, Dylan used to say, "Wow, man, that sounded good."
I'd go, "Yeah, why do take number five and six and seven? What's the next one?"
He'd go, "Well, I got this idea for this other song."
It's almost like I wanted it immediately because when he finished the song, it was finished. There might be a number of takes but he didn't have to go through six weeks of mixing and overdubbing the drum. Ruining everything because each musician thinks he has the answer so he wipes off his initial thing that everybody was crazed about. Then he puts on a different part. Part's not any good.
Dylan was just trying to play as good as he could without even thinking about the band. Everybody, just rose up to that occasion, and they all said, "What do you want us to play?"
They knew that if they stopped playing it would be done so they would just keep playing.

"Rainy Day Women 12 & 35"

I think Dylan's got a lot of Texas in his soul and in his music - that sense of happiness and joy. He was down there, man! That was Bob Dylan. He was the leader of everybody.
He first played me that song "Rainy Day Women" on the piano.
"That sounds like the damn Salvation Army band!" I said.
"Can you get one?"
"Probably not - it's two o'clock in the morning - but let me see what I can do." I called up Charlie McCoy, and he said, "I can wake up Wayne Butler. He plays trombone, and I can play trumpet." I said that's all we need' we don't need a clarinet or anything else. Get Kenny Buttrey to play the drum, all that stuff. Wayne Butler came down there, still wiping his eyes from sleep.
Dylan said, "Well it goes like this …." Nobody knew anything! McCoy and Butler had their horns. I said get yourself a drum, Kenny [Buttrey]! He put his drum out there like in a marching band.
First, Dylan played a little bit on the piano. They all marched around while he played. He said it goes C-R-G, and they were gone. All of us walking around yelling, playing and singing. That was it!
It's the only one time that I ever heard Dylan really laugh, really belly laugh, on and on, going around that studio, marching in that thing.
Nobody ever knew what Dylan was gonna do. When, how, where, what, why, anything. I used to laugh about it, because I'd see Robbie and Al sitting there, trying to follow... They couldn't have any charts or anything, so they were following where he was putting his hand. It was so spontaneous. Al Kooper used to call it the roadmap to hell!

Mixing Blonde on Blonde

Dylan was like, "Is it rolling, Bob?"
"Yeah, man, yeah it is, man." Then it would be finished and we'd go home!
I remember I'd mix in Nashville, then I'd fly out to New York. He was so funny and was such a cool guy.
One time we went up to Bleecker St., in the Village, where he was living. I took Joy with me. We're visiting, we're all talking, we start hugging and all. I gave him the acetate and he took it and put it on.
Now when I gave him an acetate, Dylan would get in there, listen to the disk that I made and write down notes. On the first song, he would be like, '"On the word 'the' in the third verse, could you bring up the bass up a 1/2 a dB." Then, on song number two he'd go, "On the word 'it', I need greater emphasis."
I'd already taken pictures of my mixing board throughout the production, - we didn't have automation - which allowed me to know exactly where everything had been set. Instead of having to get back into it, I knew just where to make these changes.
I didn't want to screw Dylan around; if he wanted a bass up a 1/2 a dB, I wanted to give it to him, instead of just telling him, "Yeah, I did it." I don't know if he would have known whether I had done what he asked or not. He might have. Was there even a difference? Maybe, sometimes I couldn't even hear it. But maybe he could. Maybe he was screwing with me. It didn't matter. Dylan deserved to get what he wanted. He would sit there and do all of that. I'd go back to Nashville and fix it. Then send it back to him and that would be it.
But this one time when Joy and I were visiting, Dylan and I were sitting there, maybe an hour and half, two hours, while he was doing that. He'd nod but not say anything. I'd nod at him, smile, everything.
Finally, Joy said "We better go; we got that thing at six o'clock."
Dylan jumped up saying, "Oh man, you don't have to leave, do you?"
He hadn't spoken to me! Since I got there, not a word for two hours! He just nodded! I nodded at him, because I thought it was funny. He didn't think anything about it; that was just him.

Blonde on Blonde: The Aftermath

I remember telling all the musicians during the recordings that this was going to be the beginning of their career, that I had short-cutted them 20 years playing country sessions in Nashville. When he went back home to New York, I told them, they could say, "Yeah, I just played with Bob Dylan."
Which is what happened. It became a different world for all of these guys, and they all thanked me for their great life.
Now, it seems like anybody that you ask will say that Nashville began when Dylan came down here. That’s the way I feel about it, too. I think Nashville was a different place before that. The producers and record people ran the business with an iron fist. They did what they wanted to, and the artist was at their beck and call.
161 critics voted Blonde on Blonde the best rock album in history. I don't know what that means. And I've got a picture I'm gonna send Dylan, it's him with Jesse who is about 3 years old or 4 years old, the both of them there with Doug Kershaw in the studio.

an interlude
Colonel Jubilation B. Johnston and His Mystic Knights Band and Street Singers

[[Postscript: As the Dylan recording sessions in Nashville for Blonde on Blonde ended, Johnston was inspired to record his own album working with the same Nashville session players. The resulting album Colonel Jubilation B. Johnston and His Mystic Knights Band and Street Singers Attack the Hits ranks high among the most rare and notorious records.
In Like a Rolling Stone: Bob Dylan at the Crossroads, Greil Marcus comments on the album:
“An album Johnston made with the Nashville component of the Blonde on Blonde band, locked in the studio in Nashville at four in the morning, with only a couple of hours to go before the alcohol runs out, Turning the Righteous Brothers’ “You’re My Soul and Inspiration” into “Rainy Day Women 12 & 35.” Turning the Mamas and the Papas’ “Monday, Monday” into “Rainy Day Women #12 & 35.” Turning Sonny and Cher’s ”Bang Bang,” Shirley Ellis’ “The Name Game,” The Young Rascals’ “Good Lovin’,” the Lovin’ Spoonful’s “Daydream,” and the McCoys’ “Hang on Sloopy” into Rainy Day Women #12 & 35.” And turning Johnny Rivers immortal “Secret Agent Man” into the even more immortal “Columbia, Gem of the Ocean.”
Reviewing this album for the All Music Guide, Mark Deming wrote: “In 1966, when Bob Dylan asked producer Bob Johnston to help conjure the booze-soaked Salvation Army band sound that kicked off the album Blonde on Blonde with its stumble-bum arrangement of "Rainy Day Women #12 & #35," he probably had no idea what he was starting. Johnston (here performing as Col. Jubilation B. Johnson), for reasons lost to history, became so enamored of the shambolic sound of "Rainy Day Women" that he and the Nashville session crew who played on Blonde on Blonde used it as the basis for an entire album….
[Featuring covers of eleven pop hits of the day…. Moldy Goldies turns each song into a massive practical joke, with nearly every number featuring addled march time drumming, bleating horns, incongruent sound effects, and vocalists desperately trying to keep a straight face amidst the chaos (and occasionally failing, collapsing into gales of laughter on at least two numbers). Greil Marcus described one track by writing, "a demented hillbilly utters "The Name Game" as if he's sure it holds the secrets of the universe," and there's simply no improving on the accuracy of that statement; elsewhere, "Leaning on a Lamp Post" sounds as if the Village Idiot had been brought into the studio after knocking back a pint of Thunderbird, "Bang Bang" is punctuated by machine gun fire, errant slide whistles dominate "Monday Monday," and the horn section invokes Stephen Foster while the rest of the band staggers through "Hang on Sloopy." A dazzling anti-masterpiece if there ever was such a thing, Moldy Goldies may be the most engagingly off-putting album ever released by a major record label, capturing a number of gifted musicians sabotaging their own performances for a hearty laugh….”]]
“You're not Dostoevsky,' said the citizeness

'Well, who knows, who knows,' he replied.

'Dostoevsky's dead,' said the citizeness, but somehow not very confidently.

'I protest!' Behemoth exclaimed hotly. 'Dostoevsky is immortal!”
The Dr
Known user
 
Posts: 1355
Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2012 6:32 pm
Location: some forgotten memory/ midday of eternity

Re: The Dylan Thread

Postby The Dr » Wed Oct 07, 2015 10:37 am




i find it kinda cute...
“You're not Dostoevsky,' said the citizeness

'Well, who knows, who knows,' he replied.

'Dostoevsky's dead,' said the citizeness, but somehow not very confidently.

'I protest!' Behemoth exclaimed hotly. 'Dostoevsky is immortal!”
The Dr
Known user
 
Posts: 1355
Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2012 6:32 pm
Location: some forgotten memory/ midday of eternity

Re: The Dylan Thread

Postby The Dr » Wed Oct 07, 2015 10:40 am




this i find beyond vulgar...
“You're not Dostoevsky,' said the citizeness

'Well, who knows, who knows,' he replied.

'Dostoevsky's dead,' said the citizeness, but somehow not very confidently.

'I protest!' Behemoth exclaimed hotly. 'Dostoevsky is immortal!”
The Dr
Known user
 
Posts: 1355
Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2012 6:32 pm
Location: some forgotten memory/ midday of eternity

Re: The Dylan Thread

Postby The Dr » Wed Oct 07, 2015 10:42 am

“You're not Dostoevsky,' said the citizeness

'Well, who knows, who knows,' he replied.

'Dostoevsky's dead,' said the citizeness, but somehow not very confidently.

'I protest!' Behemoth exclaimed hotly. 'Dostoevsky is immortal!”
The Dr
Known user
 
Posts: 1355
Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2012 6:32 pm
Location: some forgotten memory/ midday of eternity

Re: The Dylan Thread

Postby angelsighs » Fri Dec 11, 2015 10:31 am

if you were flash enough to shell out for the super duper boxset, looks like you also have been given downloads of a bunch of 1965 live shows as a 'Christmas gift' (aka a way for the estate to also renew the copyright on those)

The holidays are coming early for purchasers of The Cutting Edge 1965-1966: The Bootleg Series Volume 12: Collector's Edition, via a special gift from Columbia Records: 208 tracks encompassing more than ten hours of previously unreleased live Bob Dylan performances from his landmark 1965 tours, including 14 complete concerts – both acoustic and electric - and an array of recordings from television shows, hotel rooms, and other live appearances
angelsighs
Known user
 
Posts: 3921
Joined: Thu Jan 01, 1970 1:00 am

Re: The Dylan Thread

Postby The Dr » Fri Dec 11, 2015 7:37 pm

forever young will be the pop idol tv show thing sacrifical lamb this year


anyone get cutting edge? i got theboxset (not the superdupa one- out of my price range) but haven't even had time to open it yet!
“You're not Dostoevsky,' said the citizeness

'Well, who knows, who knows,' he replied.

'Dostoevsky's dead,' said the citizeness, but somehow not very confidently.

'I protest!' Behemoth exclaimed hotly. 'Dostoevsky is immortal!”
The Dr
Known user
 
Posts: 1355
Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2012 6:32 pm
Location: some forgotten memory/ midday of eternity

Re: The Dylan Thread

Postby The Dr » Mon Feb 01, 2016 10:36 pm

i just read an article on the international buisness times website called

Bob Dylan Is Insane Or Senile (Or Both)
By Palash Ghosh


and to support his arguement mr ghosh gets the names of albums wrong and even references a very amusing dylan interview

http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/ ... s-20120927

(read it it is great)


Do you ever worry that people interpreted your work in misguided ways? For example, some people still see "Rainy Day Women" as coded about getting high.


It doesn't surprise me that some people would see it that way. But these are people that aren't familiar with the Book of Acts.

---

you know what this is called? It's called transfiguration. Have you ever heard of it?


Yes.


Well, you're looking at somebody.


That . . . has been transfigured?


Yeah, absolutely. I'm not like you, am I? I'm not like him, either. I'm not like too many others. I'm only like another person who's been transfigured. How many people like that or like me do you know?

etc

-----

and he misquotes the interview he is referring to!



impressive work...
“You're not Dostoevsky,' said the citizeness

'Well, who knows, who knows,' he replied.

'Dostoevsky's dead,' said the citizeness, but somehow not very confidently.

'I protest!' Behemoth exclaimed hotly. 'Dostoevsky is immortal!”
The Dr
Known user
 
Posts: 1355
Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2012 6:32 pm
Location: some forgotten memory/ midday of eternity

Re: The Dylan Thread

Postby The Dr » Mon Feb 15, 2016 5:01 pm

ob Dylan is back in Studio B at Hollywood’s famed Capitol Studios recording the follow up to his critically acclaimed 2015 album, Shadows in the Night, engineer Al Schmitt told Billboard Feb. 11 at the Recording Academy’s Producers & Engineers Wing’s salute to Rick Rubin in L.A.



Schmitt, who engineered the Shadows album as well, said that Dylan is once again covering standards (although it’s unknown if the selections are all songs that Frank Sinatra had previously recorded, as they were on Shadows).

“It’s going along great,” said the 20-time Grammy winner, who had just left Dylan in the studio to come to the Rubin salute.

Dylan is producing the Columbia Records release, presumably under his Jack Frost moniker.


“He sounds great,” Schmitt said. “His mood in the studio is fabulous. We’re having a good time. We’re like two old shoes together now, we’re so comfortable with one another now.”

When asked one thing that surprised him about Dylan, Schmitt said it was his level of intelligence. “He’s extraordinarily smart and he’s so aware of everything that’s going on, so he knows what’s happening at every moment.”

Shadows in the Night, which included such classics as “Some Enchanted Evening” and “Autumn Leaves,” debuted at No. 7 on the Billboard 200. On that album, Dylan and his five-piece band recorded the songs live.
“You're not Dostoevsky,' said the citizeness

'Well, who knows, who knows,' he replied.

'Dostoevsky's dead,' said the citizeness, but somehow not very confidently.

'I protest!' Behemoth exclaimed hotly. 'Dostoevsky is immortal!”
The Dr
Known user
 
Posts: 1355
Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2012 6:32 pm
Location: some forgotten memory/ midday of eternity

Re: The Dylan Thread

Postby TheWarmth » Mon Feb 15, 2016 5:56 pm

Another album of standards covers? Meh.
TheWarmth
Known user
 
Posts: 3666
Joined: Thu Jan 01, 1970 1:00 am
Location: Chicago, IL

Re: The Dylan Thread

Postby The Dr » Wed Mar 02, 2016 10:58 pm

“You're not Dostoevsky,' said the citizeness

'Well, who knows, who knows,' he replied.

'Dostoevsky's dead,' said the citizeness, but somehow not very confidently.

'I protest!' Behemoth exclaimed hotly. 'Dostoevsky is immortal!”
The Dr
Known user
 
Posts: 1355
Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2012 6:32 pm
Location: some forgotten memory/ midday of eternity

Re: The Dylan Thread

Postby jack white » Thu Mar 03, 2016 9:41 am

Bargain.
Lou: ... We're just out of balance
Betsy: you & me?
Lou: [the] whole world
jack white
Known user
 
Posts: 1673
Joined: Sat Jan 31, 2004 12:29 am
Location: Floor of the ocean

Re: The Dylan Thread

Postby The Dr » Mon Mar 07, 2016 9:03 pm

Bob Dylan has announced details of new album 'Fallen Angels' plus tour dates.

Last year saw Dylan release his 36th studio album 'Shadows In The Night', which featured jazz and pop standards made famous by Frank Sinatra. Reports recently suggested that his next album would similarly be another album of cover 'standards'.

Limited information has been revealed about 'Fallen Angels', but a press release along with Dylan's new tour dates confirms its title. Classic Rock meanwhile reports that the record will be released on May 20.

NME has contacted Bob Dylan's press representative who could neither confirm nor deny reports of its release date.

Bob Dylan will play a 27-date tour of North America through June and July. He will be supported by Mavis Staples during the stint. Dylan will also tour Japan during April.

-----------

Of the thousands of lyrics, tapes and correspondence in the Bob Dylan Archive, one of the more intriguing items is a handwritten card from Barbra Streisand, postmarked November 1978, in which she thanks Mr. Dylan for sending flowers and suggests that they make a record together.

There is no evidence in the archive of a response from Mr. Dylan. But after seeing an article about the archive last week in The New York Times, Ms. Streisand filled in some of the back story. Here is a statement from her, relayed by a spokesman:
Continue reading the main story
Related Coverage

Bob Dylan’s Secret ArchiveMARCH 2, 2016
Quite a Garage Sale: 11 Highlights From the Bob Dylan ArchiveMARCH 4, 2016

I read the recent story in The New York Times about Bob Dylan’s archive, and I was so touched to find out he had saved a note from me.

It prompted me to go back into my own archive and retrieve a letter I had saved from him.

As I remember it, first he sent me flowers and a lovely note, asking me if I would like to sing with him. In return, I sent him the note that’s in his archive, thanking him for the flowers and the invitation. But for whatever reason, it never happened at the time.

Years later … when “Yentl” was about to come out … he sent me his latest album, along with the letter I still have. In it, he writes, “There are some songs on this album which I’m sure you would love to do.”

He adds, “I’m looking forward to seeing your movie. Maybe you can direct me in one of mine.” And then he goes on to say something that still means so much to me: “You are my favorite star. Your self-determination, wit and temperament and sense of justice have always appealed to me.”

I thought scholars, and fans, might like to know the story behind my note. And I plan to send a copy of his letter to Bob, so it can be included in his archive, as well as mine.
“You're not Dostoevsky,' said the citizeness

'Well, who knows, who knows,' he replied.

'Dostoevsky's dead,' said the citizeness, but somehow not very confidently.

'I protest!' Behemoth exclaimed hotly. 'Dostoevsky is immortal!”
The Dr
Known user
 
Posts: 1355
Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2012 6:32 pm
Location: some forgotten memory/ midday of eternity

Re: The Dylan Thread

Postby The Dr » Mon Mar 07, 2016 9:07 pm

Bob Dylan will release his 37th studio album this spring and follow its arrival with a lengthy summer tour of the United States.

Titled Fallen Angels, the new LP is scheduled to drop on May 20 — just days before Dylan’s 75th birthday — and will be made available via redemption code to most ticket buyers on the upcoming tour. According to Dylan’s Facebook page, the summer dates will see him touring with Mavis Staples as the opening act.

Although nothing has been officially confirmed, rumors continue to suggest that Fallen Angels will be a sequel of sorts to Dylan’s 2015 release, Shadows in the Night, which found him covering pop standards previously recorded by Frank Sinatra. According to sources in the fan community, the track listing is set to include “Melancholy Mood,” “All or Nothing at All,” “Come Rain or Come Shine” and “That Old Black Magic,” among others.

Dylan’s summer tour is booked starting June 4, when he plays the first of a pair of dates in Washington, and continues through July 17, when it’s currently scheduled to conclude in New Hampshire. Take a look at Dylan’s complete list of announced 2016 dates below, and visit his official site for ticketing information.

Bob Dylan 2016 Tour
4/02 — Tokyo, Japan
4/05 — Tokyo, Japan
4/06 — Tokyo, Japan
4/09 — Miyagi, Japan
4/11 — Osaka, Japan
4/12 — Osaka, Japan
4/13 — Osaka, Japan
4/15 — Nagoya, Japan
4/18 — Tokyo, Japan
4/19 — Tokyo, Japan
4/21 — Tokyo, Japan
4/22 — Tokyo, Japan
4/25 — Tokyo, Japan
4/26 — Tokyo, Japan
4/28 — Yokohama, Japan
6/04 — Woodinville, Wash.
6/05 — Woodinville, Wash.
6/07 — Eugene, Ore.
6/09 — Berkeley, Calif.
6/11 — Santa Barbara, Calif.
6/13 — San Diego, Calif.
6/14 — San Diego, Calif.
6/16 — Los Angeles, Calif.
6/19 — Morrison, Colo.
6/21 — Kansas City, Mo.
6/22 — Lincoln, Neb.
6/24 — Highland Park, Ill.
6/25 — Indianapolis, Ind.
6/26 — Nashville, Tenn.
6/28 — Kettering, Ohio
6/29 — Toledo, Ohio
6/30 — Lewiston, N.Y.
7/02 — Lenox, Mass.
7/03 — Mashantucket, Ct.
7/05 — Vienna, Va.
7/06 — Vienna, Va.
7/08 — Queens, N.Y.
7/12 — Canandaigua, N.Y.
7/13 — Philadelphia, Pa.
7/14 — Boston, Mass.
7/16 — Portland, Maine
7/17 — Gilford, N.H.
“You're not Dostoevsky,' said the citizeness

'Well, who knows, who knows,' he replied.

'Dostoevsky's dead,' said the citizeness, but somehow not very confidently.

'I protest!' Behemoth exclaimed hotly. 'Dostoevsky is immortal!”
The Dr
Known user
 
Posts: 1355
Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2012 6:32 pm
Location: some forgotten memory/ midday of eternity

Re: The Dylan Thread

Postby The Dr » Sun Apr 03, 2016 2:47 pm

hey

anyone have the bootleg

23. SEPTEMBER 1995
Fort Lauderdale / Florida - The Edge ?

http://www.n-b-u.de/show_fort_lauderdale.htm



thanks!
“You're not Dostoevsky,' said the citizeness

'Well, who knows, who knows,' he replied.

'Dostoevsky's dead,' said the citizeness, but somehow not very confidently.

'I protest!' Behemoth exclaimed hotly. 'Dostoevsky is immortal!”
The Dr
Known user
 
Posts: 1355
Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2012 6:32 pm
Location: some forgotten memory/ midday of eternity

Re: The Dylan Thread

Postby The Dr » Thu Jun 30, 2016 6:50 pm

“You're not Dostoevsky,' said the citizeness

'Well, who knows, who knows,' he replied.

'Dostoevsky's dead,' said the citizeness, but somehow not very confidently.

'I protest!' Behemoth exclaimed hotly. 'Dostoevsky is immortal!”
The Dr
Known user
 
Posts: 1355
Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2012 6:32 pm
Location: some forgotten memory/ midday of eternity

Re: The Dylan Thread

Postby The Dr » Sat Oct 01, 2016 11:21 pm

“Bob Dylan: The 1966 Live Recordings” to be Released in November
Sep 27, 2016

Columbia/Legacy Set to Release Bob Dylan: The 1966 Live Recordings, A Monumental Box Set featuring Every Known Recording from the Artist’s Mythic and Controversial 1966 Tour of the US, UK, Europe and Australia

Highly Collectible 36CD Box Set Includes Previously Unreleased Soundboards, CBS Records Mobile Recordings and Audience Tapes Capturing Electrifying Performances and Combative Crowd Responses

Many of the Recordings on this Collection Have Never Been Circulated in Any Form

Bob Dylan: The 1966 Live Recordings Available Friday, November 11, 2016

* * * * *

Pre-order now:

Bob Dylan: The 1966 Live Recordings: Amazon | Bob Dylan Store
The Real Royal Albert Hall 1966 Concert: Amazon | iTunes |Bob Dylan Store

* * * * *

Bob Dylan: The 1966 Live Recordings–a highly-collectible 36CD box set containing every known recording from the artist’s groundbreaking 1966 concert tours of the US, UK, Europe and Australia–will be released on Friday, November 11 by Columbia Records and Legacy Recordings, the catalog division of Sony Music Entertainment. The 1966 Live Recordings commemorates, in stunning sonic vérité, the 50th anniversary of the electrifying live performances that would forever change the sound and direction of rock and pop music around the world.

“While doing the archival research for The Cutting Edge 1965-1966: The Bootleg Series Vol. 12, last year’s box set of Dylan’s mid-60s studio sessions, we were continually struck by how great his 1966 live recordings really are,” said Adam Block, President, Legacy Recordings. “The intensity of Bob’s live performances and his fantastic delivery of these songs in concert add another insightful component in understanding and appreciating the musical revolution Bob Dylan ignited some 50 years ago.”

Meticulously researched, curated and restored for this extraordinary collection, Bob Dylan: The 1966 Live Recordings is drawn from three main audio sources: soundboards, CBS Records mobile recordings and audience tapes. With the exception of the Manchester concert (May 17, 1966) released as Bob Dylan Live 1966 – The Bootleg Series Vol. 4 (Columbia/Legacy) in 1998, a pair of songs appearing on the 1985 Biograph compilation and a smattering of others, the overwhelming majority of tracks and performances on Bob Dylan: The 1966 Live Recordings are previously unreleased in any format–official or bootlegged–and are being made available now for the very first time.

All the songs on The 1966 Live Recordings were written by Bob Dylan (vocal, guitar, piano, harmonica) with the sole exception of “Baby, Let Me Follow You Down,” a traditional song arranged by Bob Dylan for concert performance. Dylan is accompanied on these recordings by Robbie Robertson (guitar), Rick Danko (bass, backing vocals), Richard Manuel (piano), Garth Hudson (organ) and Mickey Jones (drums). (Sandy Konikoff plays drums on the White Plains and Pittsburgh shows only.)

Liner notes for Bob Dylan: The 1966 Live Recordings have been provided by Clinton Heylin, a consultant on the project and author of JUDAS!: From Forest Hills to the Free Trade Hall: A Historical View of Dylan’s Big Boo, the definitive written account of Dylan’s historic and pivotal 1965-66 world tours.

dylan66_pshot_

Each of the individual CDs in Bob Dylan: The 1966 Live Recordings is housed in a custom sleeve featuring stills from color film shot by D.A. Pennebaker, whose footage from Dylan’s 1965 and 1966 tours became the cinéma vérité classics Dont Look Back (1965) and Eat The Document (1966).

Columbia/Legacy will also release Bob Dylan’s performance at the Royal Albert Hall from May 26, 1966 (two days after the artist’s 25 birthday) as an album entitled The Real Royal Albert Hall 1966 Concert. For decades, Dylan’s performance in Manchester was incorrectly labeled “The Royal Albert Hall Concert.” Now, for the first time, the REAL Royal Albert Hall concert–originally recorded for a live album by CBS Records–is finally being released, mixed by Grammy-winning engineer Chris Shaw. The Real Royal Albert Hall 1966 Concert will be released as a 2CD and 12″ 2LP collection on November 25.

The performances on Bob Dylan: The 1966 Live Recordings put a fiery exclamation point on Dylan’s great mid-sixties creative epoch that produced–in an 18-month span–Bringing It All Back Home, Highway 61 Revisited and Blonde On Blonde, the trilogy of album masterpieces which secured Dylan’s reputation as a songwriter and performer of unprecedented depth, power and originality while significantly impacting the course of popular music and culture. These concert recordings from the same period document Dylan’s evolution as an on-stage phenomenon whose transformative vision saw no limits.

Bob Dylan: The 1966 Live Recordings is the ideal concert companion to The Cutting Edge 1965-1966: The Bootleg Series Vol. 12, released on Columbia/Legacy last November.

Pre-order now:

Bob Dylan: The 1966 Live Recordings: Amazon | Bob Dylan Store
The Real Royal Albert Hall 1966 Concert: Amazon | iTunes |Bob Dylan Store

bobdylan.com
columbiarecords.com
legacyrecordings.com

Bob Dylan: The 1966 Live Recordings

Disc 1 – Sydney, April 13, 1966 (Soundboard recorded by TCN 9 TV Australia)
Disc 2 – Sydney, April 13, 1966 (Soundboard recorded by TCN 9 TV Australia)
Disc 3 – Melbourne, April 20, 1966 (Soundboard / unknown broadcast)
Disc 4 – Copenhagen, May 1, 1966 (Soundboard)
Disc 5 – Dublin, May 5, 1966 (Soundboard)
Disc 6 – Dublin, May 5, 1966 (Soundboard)
Disc 7 – Belfast, May 6, 1966 (Soundboard)
Disc 8 – Belfast, May 6, 1966 (Soundboard)
Disc 9 – Bristol, May 10, 1966 (Soundboard / audience)
Disc 10 – Bristol, May 10, 1966 (Soundboard)
Disc 11 – Cardiff, May 11, 1966 (Soundboard)
Disc 12 – Birmingham, May 12, 1966 (Soundboard)
Disc 13 – Birmingham, May 12, 1966 (Soundboard)
Disc 14 – Liverpool, May 14, 1966 (Soundboard)
Disc 15 – Leicester, May 15, 1966 (Soundboard)
Disc 16 – Leicester, May 15, 1966 (Soundboard)
Disc 17 – Sheffield, May 16, 1966 (CBS Records recording)
Disc 18 – Sheffield, May 16, 1966 (Soundboard)
Disc 19 – Manchester, May 17, 1966 (CBS Records recording)
Disc 20 – Manchester, May 17, 1966 (CBS Records recording except Soundcheck / Soundboard)
Disc 21 – Glasgow, May 19, 1966 (Soundboard)
Disc 22 – Edinburgh, May 20, 1966 (Soundboard)
Disc 23 – Edinburgh, May 20, 1966 (Soundboard)
Disc 24 – Newcastle, May 21, 1966 (Soundboard)
Disc 25 – Newcastle, May 21, 1966 (Soundboard)
Disc 26 – Paris, May 24, 1966 (Soundboard)
Disc 27 – Paris, May 24, 1966 (Soundboard)
Disc 28 – London, May 26, 1966 (CBS Records recording)
Disc 29 – London, May 26, 1966 (CBS Records recording)
Disc 30 – London, May 27, 1966 (CBS Records recording)
Disc 31 – London, May 27, 1966 (CBS Records recordings)
Disc 32 – White Plains, NY, February 5, 1966 (Audience tape)
Disc 33 – Pittsburgh, PA, February 6, 1966 (Audience tape)
Disc 34 – Hempstead, NY, February 26, 1966 (Audience tape)
Disc 35 – Melbourne, April 19, 1966 (Audience tape)
Disc 36 – Stockholm, April 29, 1966 (Audience tape)
“You're not Dostoevsky,' said the citizeness

'Well, who knows, who knows,' he replied.

'Dostoevsky's dead,' said the citizeness, but somehow not very confidently.

'I protest!' Behemoth exclaimed hotly. 'Dostoevsky is immortal!”
The Dr
Known user
 
Posts: 1355
Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2012 6:32 pm
Location: some forgotten memory/ midday of eternity

Re: The Dylan Thread

Postby runaway » Sun Oct 02, 2016 4:27 am

This should be good - he was all fucked up on smack in '66, wasn't he?
runaway
Known user
 
Posts: 465
Joined: Thu Jan 01, 1970 1:00 am
Location: the shadows

Re: The Dylan Thread

Postby jack white » Mon Oct 03, 2016 2:28 pm

Inside the museums, infinity goes up on trial
Voices echo this is what salvation must be like after a while


Really tho, how many Visions harmonica solo's can a person reasonably be expected to get lost in in one lifetime?! I don't think there's enough weed in the world for me to make it thru 36 discs of theses.. I like the idea of trying mind you..
Lou: ... We're just out of balance
Betsy: you & me?
Lou: [the] whole world
jack white
Known user
 
Posts: 1673
Joined: Sat Jan 31, 2004 12:29 am
Location: Floor of the ocean

Re: The Dylan Thread

Postby jack white » Mon Oct 03, 2016 2:39 pm

And the ladies treat me kindly & furnish me with tape.
But deep inside my heart I know I can't escape..
Lou: ... We're just out of balance
Betsy: you & me?
Lou: [the] whole world
jack white
Known user
 
Posts: 1673
Joined: Sat Jan 31, 2004 12:29 am
Location: Floor of the ocean

Re: The Dylan Thread

Postby angelsighs » Mon Oct 03, 2016 7:11 pm

Pass! It's obviously just a copywright extension measure. If you're a big enough fan to want to listen through it, then crack on- fair play to you. But not for me.
It's not like the setlists even varied that much on the tour.
angelsighs
Known user
 
Posts: 3921
Joined: Thu Jan 01, 1970 1:00 am

Re: The Dylan Thread

Postby TheWarmth » Wed Oct 05, 2016 5:37 pm

The "Royal Albert Hall" gig, which was actually the Manchester show, was released as Bootleg Series Vol. 4 many years ago ('98?), so you can check that out if you're curious. It's awesome, but I don't think I need any more of this stuff. Dylan freaks are naturally going nuts over it, though.
TheWarmth
Known user
 
Posts: 3666
Joined: Thu Jan 01, 1970 1:00 am
Location: Chicago, IL

Re: The Dylan Thread

Postby The Dr » Wed Oct 05, 2016 7:46 pm

persoanlly i think it look very exciting- probably is a liscence thing as angelsighs said- last time they gave away the 65 tour boots free with the super dupa version- but personally i find this more exciting than the whitmark demos or self outtakes but will i listen to them all? uh...
“You're not Dostoevsky,' said the citizeness

'Well, who knows, who knows,' he replied.

'Dostoevsky's dead,' said the citizeness, but somehow not very confidently.

'I protest!' Behemoth exclaimed hotly. 'Dostoevsky is immortal!”
The Dr
Known user
 
Posts: 1355
Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2012 6:32 pm
Location: some forgotten memory/ midday of eternity

Re: The Dylan Thread

Postby angelsighs » Fri Oct 07, 2016 9:31 pm

TheWarmth wrote:The "Royal Albert Hall" gig, which was actually the Manchester show, was released as Bootleg Series Vol. 4 many years ago ('98?), so you can check that out if you're curious. It's awesome, but I don't think I need any more of this stuff. Dylan freaks are naturally going nuts over it, though.


oh yeah, I've got that one- and incredible stuff it is indeed. but I just don't think I need 36 more discs of the same setlist.

I see they are releasing a standalone album of the 'Real Albert Hall Show'.. but again, its basically the same setlist!
i'm sure there's a fair amount of nuances and different vibes but it's not like the Grateful Dead or something where every show is different.
angelsighs
Known user
 
Posts: 3921
Joined: Thu Jan 01, 1970 1:00 am

Re: The Dylan Thread

Postby The Dr » Sat Oct 08, 2016 11:52 am

angelsighs wrote:oh yeah, I've got that one- and incredible stuff it is indeed. but I just don't think I need 36 more discs of the same setlist.

I see they are releasing a standalone album of the 'Real Albert Hall Show'.. but again, its basically the same setlist!
i'm sure there's a fair amount of nuances and different vibes but it's not like the Grateful Dead or something where every show is different.



it's odd

plays the same setlist- people complain
plays different setlists/versions of songs- people complain
plays the same setlist- people complain
plays different setlists/versions of songs- people complain
currently plays the same setlist- people complain
“You're not Dostoevsky,' said the citizeness

'Well, who knows, who knows,' he replied.

'Dostoevsky's dead,' said the citizeness, but somehow not very confidently.

'I protest!' Behemoth exclaimed hotly. 'Dostoevsky is immortal!”
The Dr
Known user
 
Posts: 1355
Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2012 6:32 pm
Location: some forgotten memory/ midday of eternity

Re: The Dylan Thread

Postby angelsighs » Sat Oct 08, 2016 12:58 pm

Well obviously it's impossible to please everybody. But myself personally prefers it when bands vary setlists somewhat. It's actually not that hard to cover both bases- have certain old warhorses that never change. Then rotate other rarer songs.

I'm not having a go at Bob. In the sixties there was much less variations in setlists on the live scene. You had a show and you basically toured that.

Obviously later on Bob became really good at just playing whatever he wanted! On the early shows of the never ending tour you didn't know what you were going to get!
angelsighs
Known user
 
Posts: 3921
Joined: Thu Jan 01, 1970 1:00 am

Re: The Dylan Thread

Postby The Dr » Sat Oct 08, 2016 4:54 pm

angelsighs wrote:Well obviously it's impossible to please everybody. But myself personally prefers it when bands vary setlists somewhat. It's actually not that hard to cover both bases- have certain old warhorses that never change. Then rotate other rarer songs.

I'm not having a go at Bob. In the sixties there was much less variations in setlists on the live scene. You had a show and you basically toured that.

Obviously later on Bob became really good at just playing whatever he wanted! On the early shows of the never ending tour you didn't know what you were going to get!


o sure, i didn't think you were! i think the rolling setlists is something that would appeal to people more who go to 2 or more shows per tour whereas a more set setlist means that different people each night get to hear the 'key' songs for the tour with maybe one or two changes
“You're not Dostoevsky,' said the citizeness

'Well, who knows, who knows,' he replied.

'Dostoevsky's dead,' said the citizeness, but somehow not very confidently.

'I protest!' Behemoth exclaimed hotly. 'Dostoevsky is immortal!”
The Dr
Known user
 
Posts: 1355
Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2012 6:32 pm
Location: some forgotten memory/ midday of eternity

Re: The Dylan Thread

Postby jack white » Thu Oct 13, 2016 12:53 pm

Nobel Prize winner..
Lou: ... We're just out of balance
Betsy: you & me?
Lou: [the] whole world
jack white
Known user
 
Posts: 1673
Joined: Sat Jan 31, 2004 12:29 am
Location: Floor of the ocean

Re: The Dylan Thread

Postby semisynthetic » Thu Oct 13, 2016 4:15 pm

jack white wrote:Nobel Prize winner..


Congratulations to Dylan! I smiled upon hearing this just a few minutes ago - for I believe those I know (well) are more or less equally split - either loving or loathing Bob Dylan. Why? I don't know. One old friend, now a State away, plays early pieces from a "special system" in the attic, whenever he and his wife are at odds with each other, for he is a great fan - she is decidedly NOT, and to hear the muffled "Subterranean Homesick Blues" flowing from the attic as one approaches the house is a signal to turn around and leave. How unfortunate for them both.

Bob Dylan unquestionably influenced a number of musicians over all these years, and I enjoy finding obscure, original 7" singles of his works from around the world; a few are listed in the "Last five LPs you Bought" Thread.

The Nobel Prize comes with $900,000.00, and who could not use a little extra money? One of the members compared his work to Ancient Greek Poetry. There are worse things to be compared to.
"Everything is a Poison; it is the amount or degree that separates one Poison from another"
Paracelsus
semisynthetic
Known user
 
Posts: 1447
Joined: Mon Nov 01, 2010 6:39 pm
Location: Undefined; drifting ever further and further away

Re: The Dylan Thread

Postby jack white » Thu Oct 13, 2016 8:07 pm

He is one of my spirit guides.

I'm disappointed, but not surprised of that tale semi told of a partner weaponising him. I dropped a relationship when someone nastily dismissed him as, "he sounds like a peadophile."
But mostly I've found he's a unifier. & that I have a deep affection for anyone who has travelled with him: they must have some understanding of the trip I'm on & vice versa (I've got nothin but affection for all those who've sailed with me..) .
Nobody's perfect but there are rights and wrongs & he has a way of explaining & clarifying things that give me happiness, comfort & some kind of knowledge. I love his use of language and his delivery. I love his poetry and his performances.

I don't have any of his courage tho.

And I'll tell and speak it and think it and breathe it
And reflect from the mountain so all souls can see it
And I'll stand on the ocean until I start sinkin

He has done what he said he was going to do & is still doing it - think he closed his set at that desert/coachella/dad rock festival with Masters of War, how cool is that if he did?!
Lou: ... We're just out of balance
Betsy: you & me?
Lou: [the] whole world
jack white
Known user
 
Posts: 1673
Joined: Sat Jan 31, 2004 12:29 am
Location: Floor of the ocean

Re: The Dylan Thread gets a bit Silly

Postby semisynthetic » Thu Oct 13, 2016 10:13 pm

I imagine a great many couples disagree on much more than simply a musician they like or not and do just fine. I know my wife has long expected ANYTHING, any bizarre noise (to her ears), to vibrate the walls of the house and pop the lightbulbs. She was puzzled by Wild Man Fischer's 1st LP, but so am I. We BOTH enjoy most of what is played, and that I think is perhaps more important than we "must" agree on everything, or a particular artist or a particular ANYTHING that is played; we both enjoy a wide breadth of musical genres.
Last edited by semisynthetic on Fri Oct 14, 2016 6:34 am, edited 2 times in total.
"Everything is a Poison; it is the amount or degree that separates one Poison from another"
Paracelsus
semisynthetic
Known user
 
Posts: 1447
Joined: Mon Nov 01, 2010 6:39 pm
Location: Undefined; drifting ever further and further away

Re: The Dylan Thread

Postby The Dr » Thu Oct 13, 2016 11:05 pm

jack white wrote:He is one of my spirit guides.

I'm disappointed, but not surprised of that tale semi told of a partner weaponising him. I dropped a relationship when someone nastily dismissed him as, "he sounds like a peadophile."
But mostly I've found he's a unifier. & that I have a deep affection for anyone who has travelled with him: they must have some understanding of the trip I'm on & vice versa (I've got nothin but affection for all those who've sailed with me..) .
Nobody's perfect but there are rights and wrongs & he has a way of explaining & clarifying things that give me happiness, comfort & some kind of knowledge. I love his use of language and his delivery. I love his poetry and his performances.

I don't have any of his courage tho.

And I'll tell and speak it and think it and breathe it
And reflect from the mountain so all souls can see it
And I'll stand on the ocean until I start sinkin

He has done what he said he was going to do & is still doing it - think he closed his set at that desert/coachella/ GRANDdad rock festival with Masters of War, how cool is that if he did?!



Setlist
share setlist


Rainy Day Women #12 & 35
Play Video
Don't Think Twice, It's All Right
Play Video
Highway 61 Revisited
Play Video
It's All Over Now, Baby Blue
Play Video
High Water (For Charley Patton)
Play Video
Simple Twist of Fate
Play Video
Early Roman Kings
Play Video
Love Sick
Play Video
Tangled Up in Blue
(alternate lyrics)
Play Video
Lonesome Day Blues
Play Video
Make You Feel My Love
Play Video
Pay in Blood
Play Video
Desolation Row
Play Video
Soon After Midnight
Play Video
Ballad of a Thin Man
Play Video
Encore:
Masters of War
“You're not Dostoevsky,' said the citizeness

'Well, who knows, who knows,' he replied.

'Dostoevsky's dead,' said the citizeness, but somehow not very confidently.

'I protest!' Behemoth exclaimed hotly. 'Dostoevsky is immortal!”
The Dr
Known user
 
Posts: 1355
Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2012 6:32 pm
Location: some forgotten memory/ midday of eternity

PreviousNext

Return to Music (Dedicated to Fuzzhead)

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest